An historical and critical account of the life and writings of Charles I, king of Great Britain: After the manner of Mr. Bayle. Drawn from original writers and state-papers (Google eBook)

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Printed for R. Griffiths, 1758 - 428 pages
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Page 250 - Majesty would be also graciously pleased, for the further comfort and safety of your people, to declare your royal will and pleasure, that in the things aforesaid all your officers and ministers shall serve you according...
Page 77 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Page 42 - He was likewise very strict in observing the hours of his private cabinet devotions ; and was so severe an exactor of gravity and reverence in all mention of religion, that he could never endure any light or profane word...
Page 224 - ... the Church, to whose service by the intentions of my parents and friends I was destined of a child, and in mine own resolutions, till coming to some maturity of years and perceiving what tyranny had invaded the Church, that he who would take Orders must subscribe slave, and take an oath withal, which unless he took with a conscience that would retch he must either straight perjure, or split his faith, I thought it better to prefer a blameless silence before the sacred office of speaking bought,...
Page 249 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Page 103 - Arcadia ; a book in that kind full of worth and wit, but among religious thoughts and duties not worthy to be named; nor to be read at any time without good caution, much less in time of trouble and affliction to be a Christian's prayer-book...
Page 103 - ... of his saintly exercises, a prayer stolen word for word from the mouth of a heathen woman praying to a heathen god?
Page 102 - But this King, not content with that which, although in a thing holy, is no holy theft to attribute to his own making other men's whole prayers...
Page 242 - Remember that parliaments are altogether in my power for their calling, sitting and dissolution; therefore as I find the fruits of them good or evil, they are to continue or not to be.
Page 239 - Where the word of a king is, there is power: and who may say unto him, What doest thou?

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