Film art: an introduction

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McGraw-Hill, 2004 - Performing Arts - 532 pages
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Review: Film Art: An Introduction (Seventh Edition)

User Review  - Jay Amari - Goodreads

Anyone with an interest in film or who likes to watch movies with an understanding of the processes that involve filmmaking, will get something from this excellent edition of a text book that has ... Read full review

Review: Film Art: An Introduction (Seventh Edition)

User Review  - CJ Fusco - Goodreads

The quintessential "intro to Film" textbook. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

David Bordwell is Jacques Ledoux Professor of Film Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a master's degree and a doctorate from the University of Iowa. He is the author of The Films of Carl Theodor Dreyer (University California Press, 1981), Narration in the Fiction Film (University Wisconsin Press, 1985), Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema (British Film Institute/Princeton University Press, 1988), Making Meaning: Inference and Rhetoric in the Interpretation of Cinema (Harvard University Press, 1989), The Cinema of Eisenstein (Harvard University Press, 1993), On the History of Film Style (Harvard University Press, 1997) and Planet Hong Kong: Popular Cinema and the Art of Entertainment (Harvard University Press, 2000). He has won a University Distinguished Teaching Award.

Kristin Thompson is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. She holds a master's degree in film from the University of Iowa and a doctorate in film from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. She has published Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible (Princeton University Press, 1981), Exporting Entertainment: America's Place in World Film Markets, 1907-1934 (British Film Institute, 1985), Breaking the Glass Armor: Neoformalist Film Analysis (Princeton University Press, 1988), Wooster Proposes, Jeeves Disposes; or Le Mot Juste (James H. Heinman, 1992), Storytelling in the New Hollywood (Harvard University Press, 1999), Storytelling in Film and Television (Harvard University Press, 2003), and Herr Lubitsch Goes to Hollywood: German and American Film after World War I (University of Amsterdam, 2005). In her spare time she studies Egyptology.

The authors have collaborated on Film History (McGraw-Hill, 1994) with Janet Staiger, on The Classical Hollywood Cinema (Columbia University Press, 1985) and Storytelling in the New Hollywood (Harvard University Press, 1999).

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