The Electric Meme: A New Theory of How We Think

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jul 2, 2002 - Science - 392 pages
4 Reviews
From biology to culture to the new new economy, the buzzword on everyone's lips is "meme." How do animals learn things? How does human culture evolve? How does viral marketing work? The answer to these disparate questions and even to what is the nature of thought itself is, simply, the meme. For decades researchers have been convinced that memes were The Next Big Thing for the understanding of society and ourselves. But no one has so far been able to define what they are. Until now.

Here, for the first time, Robert Aunger outlines what a meme physically is, how memes originated, how they developed, and how they have made our brains into their survival systems. They are thoughts. They are parasites. They are in control. A meme is a distinct pattern of electrical charges in a node in our brains that reproduces a thousand times faster than a bacterium. Memes have found ways to leap from one brain to another. A number of them are being replicated in your brain as you read this paragraph.

In 1976 the biologist Richard Dawkins suggested that all animals -- including humans -- are puppets and that genes hold the strings. That is, we are robots serving as life support for the genes that control us. And all they want to do is replicate themselves. But then, we do lots of things that don't seem to help genes replicate. We decide not to have children, we waste our time doing dangerous things like mountain climbing, or boring things like reading, or stupid things like smoking that don't seem to help genes get copied into the next generation. We do all sorts of cultural things for reasons that don't seem to have anything to do with genes. Fashions in sports, books, clothes, ideas, politics, lifestyles come and go and give our lives meaning, so how can we be gene robots?

Dawkins recognized that something else was going on. We communicate with one another and we get ideas, and these ideas seem to have a life of their own. Maybe there was something called memes that were like thought genes. Maybe our bodies were gene robots and our minds were meme robots. That would mean that what we think is not the result of our own creativity, but rather the result of the evolutionary flow of memes as they wash through us.

What is the biological reality of an idea with a life of its own? What is a thought gene? It's a meme. And no one before Robert Aunger has established what it physically must be. This elegant, paradigm-shifting analysis identifies how memes replicate in our brains, how they evolved, and how they use artifacts like books and photographs and advertisements to get from one brain to another. Destined to inflame arguments about free will, open doors to new ways of sharing our thoughts, and provide a revolutionary explanation of consciousness, The Electric Meme will change the way each of us thinks about our minds, our cultures, and our daily choices.

  

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Review: The Electric Meme: A New Theory of How We Think

User Review  - Rick Gunn - Goodreads

This book was so incredibly dull and hard to follow. The idea of memetics was incredibly exciting to me, and Robert Aunger has sucked the interest right out of the subject. Read full review

Review: The Electric Meme: A New Theory of How We Think

User Review  - Mani Scienide - Goodreads

This one's a slow read but does a great job of filling in the gap between memetics and semiotics. It does a DEEP dive into replication theory and will change the way that you think about thought and representation. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
In the Middle of a Muddle
7
A Special Kind of Inheritance
24
Adding Rooms to Darwins House
65
The Replicator Zoo
93
The Data on Information
136
Stalking the Wild Meme
159
Memes as a State of Mind
178
Escape from Planet Brain
232
The TechnoTango
276
Rethinking Replication
311
The Revolution of Memes
323
Notes
335
Bibliography
357
Acknowledgments
373
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Robert Aunger received his Ph.D. in anthropology from UCLA. He has taught at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Cambridge. He was until recently a Research Fellow at King's College, Cambridge, and is currently affiliated with the Department of Biological Anthropology at the same university. He organized the first academic conference dedicated to memes, which resulted in his book Darwinizing Culture: The Status of Memetics as a Science. He lives in Cambridge, England.

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