Quiet Days in Clichy

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Grove Press, 1987 - Fiction - 154 pages
25 Reviews
This tender and nostalgic work dates from the same period as Tropic of Cancer (1934). It is a celebration of love, art, and the Bohemian life at a time when the world was simpler and slower, and Miller an obscure, penniless young writer in Paris. Whether discussing the early days of his long friendship with Alfred Perles or his escapades at the Club Melody brothel, in Quiet Days in Clichy Miller describes a period that would shape his entire life and oeuvre.
  

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Review: Quiet Days in Clichy

User Review  - Henry Martin - Goodreads

Quiet Days in Clichy - there is nothing quiet about Miller's days in Clichy. Henry Miller is my 'one author who affected me the most' (and I am not using the word influenced on purpose). I've read and ... Read full review

Review: Quiet Days in Clichy

User Review  - Isabelle - Goodreads

Used to have a German version that featured lots of pornographic photographs, I have no idea where it's gone... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
97
Section 3
154
Copyright

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Page 162 - Here in my opinion is the only imaginative prose-writer of the slightest value who has appeared among the English-speaking races for some years past. Even if that is objected to as an overstatement, it will probably be admitted that Miller is a writer out of the ordinary, worth more than a single glance; and after all, he is a completely negative, unconstructive, amoral writer, a mere Jonah, a passive...

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About the author (1987)

Henry Miller, American novelist, was born in 1891 in New York City. His most famous works, Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, were written while Miller was an expatriate living in Paris and were originally published in France in the mid-1930s. At that time, the two books were widely considered obscene in the United States, and they were banned from sale there until 1961. Some of Miller's other works include The Colossus of Maroussi and Big Sur and the Oranges of Heironymus Bosch. Henry Miller was married five times and he also had an extended love affair with Anais Nin. He died in 1980 in his Pacific Palisades, Calif., home.

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