Proceedings of the Bath Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Bleeck and Leech, 1873 - Bath (England)
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Page 188 - The poet that beautified the sect that was otherwise inferior to the rest saith yet excellently well: "It 20 is a pleasure to stand upon the shore and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth...
Page 31 - We have short time to stay as you, We have as short a Spring ; As quick a growth to meet decay, As you, or anything. We die As your hours do, and dry Away, Like to the summer's rain ; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 269 - And tires their echoes with unvaried cries. Sunk are thy bowers in shapeless ruin all, And the long grass o'ertops the mouldering wall; And trembling, shrinking from the spoiler's hand, Far, far away, thy children leave the land.
Page 31 - TO DAFFODILS FAIR Daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon : As yet the early-rising Sun Has not attained his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song ; And, having prayed together, we Will go with you along.
Page 332 - And now, behold, I know that ye all, among whom I have gone preaching the kingdom of God, shall see my face no more.
Page 33 - Ah, what a life were this! how sweet! how lovely ! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings, that fear their subjects' treachery ? O, yes it doth ; a thousand-fold it doth.
Page 188 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 257 - A few naturalists, endowed with much flexibility of mind, and who have already begun to doubt the immutability of species, may be influenced by this volume; but I look with confidence to the future, to young and rising naturalists, who will be able to view both sides...
Page 16 - Yet marked I where the bolt of Cupid fell : It fell upon a little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, And maidens call it love-in-idleness.
Page 21 - ... full of roses. And these were the first rose-trees and roses, both white and red, that ever any man saw ; and thus was this maiden saved by the grace of God.

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