A Complete History of the Invasions of England, Including the Most Memorable Battles and Sea-fights from Julius Caesar, Down to the French Landing in Wales in 1796: The Calamites of France, Being a Catalogue of French Cruelties, with a Complete Abstract from Barruel's History of the French Clergy, Detailing the Refined System of Murder Pursued by the Notorious Jourdan, Carrier, Marrat, General Duquesnoy, and Robespierre; the Ejectment of the Priesthood, and Total Abolition of Religion and Humanity in France (Google eBook)

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J. Skirven, 1801 - Great Britain - 202 pages
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Page 33 - Let tyrants fear ... I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects...
Page 33 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too ; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm ; to which rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.
Page 33 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.
Page 33 - ... your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.
Page 33 - ... grow by me, I myself will take up arms; I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field. I know already for your forwardness you have deserved rewards and crowns, and we do assure you, on the word of a prince, they shall be duly paid you.
Page 35 - Italy, in imitation of Camden, has asserted, that the Armada, though the ships bore every sail, yet advanced with a slow motion; as if the ocean groaned with supporting, and the winds were tired with impelling, so enormous a weight.
Page 33 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 33 - I am come amongst you at this time, not as for my recreation or sport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all; to lay down, for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have...
Page 73 - While these measures were taken with equal vigour and deliberation, sir Edward Hawke steered his course directly for Quiberon, on the coast of Bretagne, which he supposed would be the rendezvous of the French squadron : but notwithstanding his utmost efforts, he was driven by a hard gale considerably to the westward, where he was joined by two frigates, the Maidstone and Coventry. These he directed to keep ahead of the squadron. The weather growing more moderate, the former made the signal for seeing...
Page 7 - The Barbarians drive us to the sea, and the sea forces us back to the Barbarians ; between which we have only the choice of two deaths, either to be swallowed up by the waves, or butchered by the sword.

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