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Books Books 1 - 10 of 13 on Gentlemen, if you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved....  
" Gentlemen, if you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days. "
Battles and Leaders of the Civil War - Page 75
edited by - 1887
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Annual Report, Volume 1

American Historical Association - History - 1915
...surrender of Sumter.1 Anderson refused; but as Beauregard's aides left the fort he remarked to them, "If you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." All this being communicated by telegraph to the Confederate War Department, Beauregard was instructed...
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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850, Volume 3

James Ford Rhodes - United States - 1895 - 662 pages
...consultation with his officers, refused compliance; but when he handed the aides his written reply he said, " Gentlemen, if you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." ' This remark was deemed by Beauregard so important that he telegraphed it to Montgomery in connection...
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History of the United States from the compromise of 1850 to the ..., Volume 3

James Ford Rhodes - United States - 1895
...consultation with his officers, refused compliance; but when he handed the aides his written reply he said, " Gentlemen, if you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." ' This remark was deemed by Beauregard so important that he telegraphed it to Montgomery in connection...
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A political history of the state of New York, Volume 3

De Alva Stanwood Alexander - New York (State) - 1909
...aides, who submitted the demand on the afternoon of April 11, Anderson refused to withdraw, adding, " if you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." ' 3 To this message the Confederate Secretary of War replied : " Do not desire needlessly to bombard...
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The Civil War

Charles Lester Barstow - United States - 1912
...demand was delivered to Major Anderson at 3 45 PM, by two aides of General Beauregard, James Chestnut, Jr., and myself. At 4:30 p. M. he handed us his reply,...were communicated to the Confederate authorities at Montgomery. The Secretary of War, LP Walker, replied to Beauregard as follows: Do not desire needlessly...
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Annual Report, Volume 1

American Historical Association - History - 1915
...surrender of Sumter.1 Anderson refused; but as Beauregard's aides left the fort he remarked to them, "If you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." All this being communicated by telegraph to the Confederate War Department, Beauregard was instructed...
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history of the civil war

james ford rhodes - 1917
...his refusal to comply with it he observed to the Confederate aides, the bearers of Beauregard's note, "If you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." 3 Beauregard, acting with caution, transmitted this remark to Montgomery where equal caution not to...
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History of the Civil War, 1861-1865

James Ford Rhodes - United States - 1917 - 454 pages
...his refusal to comply with it he observed to the Confederate aides, the bearers of Beauregard's note, "If you do not batter the fort to pieces about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." * Beauregard, acting with caution, transmitted this remark to Montgomery where equal caution not to...
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The Lincoln Reader

Angle - Biography & Autobiography - 1990 - 564 pages
The Lincoln Reader is a biography of Abraham Lincoln written by sixty-five authors. Paul Angle, the noted Lincoln scholar, selected passages from the works on contemporaries ...
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P.G.T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray

Thomas Harry Williams - Biography & Autobiography - 1995 - 345 pages
...without further warning. After a moment's hesitation, Chesnut said he thought not. Anderson then said, "Gentlemen, if you do not batter the fort to pieces...about us, we shall be starved out in a few days." Somewhat astonished by this unexpected information, the aides left for Charleston.1s They reported...
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