The life of Samuel Johnson. Copious notes by Malone (Google eBook)

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1821
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Page 50 - There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.
Page 68 - I made a calculation, that if I should write but a page a day, at the same rate, I should, in ten years, write nine volumes in folio, of an ordinary size and print.
Page 264 - Very well done, to be sure, Sir. That book is a striking proof of the justice of Pope's remark: Each might his several province well command, Would all but stoop to what they understand.
Page 87 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 258 - Sir, I am obliged to Mr. Dilly. I will wait upon him ' BOSWELL. 'Provided, sir, I suppose, that the company which he is to have is agreeable to you.' JOHNSON. 'What do you mean, sir ? What do you take me for ? Do you think I am so ignorant of the world as to imagine that I am to prescribe to a gentleman what company he is to have at his table ?
Page 276 - Sir Joshua agreed to carry it to Dr. Johnson, who received it with much good humour,1 and desired Sir Joshua to tell the gentlemen, that he would alter the Epitaph in any manner they pleased, as to the sense of it; but he would never consent to disgrace the walls of Westminster Abbey with an English inscription.
Page 290 - ALMIGHTY God, who alone canst order the unruly wills and affections of sinful men ; Grant unto thy people, that they may love the thing which thou commandest, and desire that which thou dost promise ; that so, among the sundry and manifold changes of the world, our hearts may surely there be fixed, where true joys are to be found ; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Page 69 - I wrote for some months in The Universal Visitor, for poor Smart, while he was mad, not then knowing the terms on which he was engaged to write, and thinking I was doing him good. I hoped his wits would soon return to him. Mine returned to me, and I wrote in The Universal Visitor no longer.
Page 353 - The horror of death, which I had always observed in Dr. Johnson, appeared strong to-night. I ventured to tell him, that I had been, for moments in my life, not afraid of death ; therefore I could suppose another man in that state of mind for a considerable space of time. He said, " he never had a moment in which death was not terrible to him.
Page 173 - ... tavern, I experience an oblivion of care, and a freedom from solicitude: when I am seated, I find the master courteous, and the servants obsequious to my call; anxious to know and ready to supply my wants : wine there exhilarates my spirits, and prompts me to free conversation and an interchange of discourse with those whom I most love : I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinion and sentiments I find delight.

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