Liberation: Diaries: 1970-1983 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Nov 20, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 928 pages
4 Reviews

"A slip of a wild boy: with quick silver eyes," as Virginia Woolf saw him in the 1930s, Christopher Isherwood journeyed and changed with his century, until, by the 1980s, he was celebrated as the finest prose writer in English and the grand old man of gay liberation. In this final volume of his diaries, the capstone of a million-word masterwork, Isherwood greets advancing age with poignant humor and an unquenchable appetite for the new; even aches, illnesses, and diminishing powers are clues to a predicament still unfathomed. The mainstays of his mature contentment—his Hindu guru, Swami Prabhavananda, and his long-term companion, Don Bachardy—draw from him an unexpected high tide of joy and love.

Around his private religious and domestic routines orbit gifted friends both anonymous and infamous. Bachardy's burgeoning career pulled Isherwood into the 1970s art scenes in Los Angeles, New York, and London, where we meet Rauschenberg, Ruscha, and Warhol (serving fetid meat for lunch), as well as Hockney (adored) and Kitaj. Collaborating with Bachardy on scripts for the prizewinning Frankenstein and the Broadway fiasco A Meeting by the River, Isherwood extended his ties in Hollywood and in the theater world. John Huston, Merchant and Ivory, John Travolta, David Bowie, John Voight, Armistead Maupin, Elton John, and Joan Didion each take a turn through Isherwood's densely populated human comedy, sketched with both ruthlessness and benevolence against the background of the Vietnam War, the energy crisis, and the Nixon, Carter, and Reagan White Houses.

In Kathleen and Frank, his first book of this period, Isherwood unearthed the family demons that haunted his fugitive youth. When contemporaries began to die, he responded in Christopher and His Kind and My Guru and His Disciple with startling fresh truths about shared experiences. These are the most concrete and the most mysterious of his diaries, candidly revealing the fear of death that crowded in past Isherwood's fame, and showing how his lifelong immersion in the day-to-day lifted him, paradoxically, toward transcendence.

  

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Review: Liberation: Diaries:1970-1983

User Review  - David Guy - Goodreads

I have now read all three volumes of Christopher Isherwood's diaries, a monumental task. Years ago a friend told me they would be great when they finally came out, and if not great they are at least ... Read full review

Review: Liberation: Diaries:1970-1983

User Review  - Terrence Paris - Goodreads

After I finished reading The Sixties I wanted to press on and read the remaining diary entries with the last one dated July 4 1983. Some names from the previous decade have disappeared: old friends ... Read full review

Contents

September2
31 1975
DaytoDay Diary January 1July 31 1976
August11976June 91980 July 161980July 41983 Glossary
xviii
About the Author Books by Christopher Isherwood Credits
cxx

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About the author (2012)

Christopher Isherwood (1904–1986) was one of the most prominent writers of his generation. He is the author of many works of fiction, including All the Conspirators, The Memorial, Mr. Norris Changes Trains, and Goodbye to Berlin, on which the musical Cabaret was based, as well as works of nonfiction and biography.

Bibliographic information