Nationalism and Self-Government: The Politics of Autonomy in Scotland and Catalonia

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 3, 2008 - History - 223 pages
0 Reviews
Scotland and Catalonia, both ancient nations with strong nationalisms within larger states, are exemplars of the management of ethnic conflict in multinational democracies and of global trends toward regional government. Focusing on these two countries, Scott L. Greer explores why nationalist mobilization arose when it did and why it stopped at autonomy rather than statehood. He challenges the notion that national identity or institutional design explains their relative success as stable multinational democracies and argues that the key is their strong regional societies and their regional organizations’ preferences for autonomy and environmental stability
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Contents

Autonomy and Its Explanations
1
Two Stateless Nations Scotland and Catalonia
15
Politics
39
Scotland 19601979 The Road to Nowhere
41
Scotland 19791997 Centralization and Backlash
67
Catalonia 19751980 Compelling Autonomy
93
Catalonia 19802000
117
Policies
139
Shaping Autonomous Scotland The Scotland Office and Scotland Acts
143
Constructing Catalonia Policy Sectors and the Politics of Competencies
161
Will they stay or will they go?
179
Notes
191
References
195
Index
219
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Scott L. Greer is Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He is the author of Territorial Politics and Health Policy: UK Health Policy in Comparative Perspective and the editor of Territory, Democracy, and Justice: Regionalism and Federalism in Western Democracies.

Bibliographic information