Civic Culture and Urban Change: Governing Dallas

Front Cover
Wayne State University Press, 2003 - Political Science - 457 pages
0 Reviews

Civic Culture and Urban Change analyzes the Dallas government’s adaptation to shifts in its demography and economic structure that occurred after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. The book examines civic culture as a product of a governing regime and the constraints it placed on the capacity of the city to adapt to changes in its population, economy, and the distribution of political power. Royce Hanson traces the impact of civic culture in Dallas over the past forty years upon the city’s handling of major crises in education, policing, and management of urban development and shows the reciprocal effect of those responses on the development of civic capital.

Hanson relates the city’s civic culture to its economic history and political institutions by following the progression of Dallas governance from business oligarchy to regency of professional managers and federal judges. He studies the city’s responses to school desegregation, police–minority conflicts, and other issues to illuminate the role civic and organizational cultures play in shaping political tactics and policy. Hanson builds a profile of political life in Dallas that highlights the city’s low voter turnouts, sparse civic and political networks, and relative lack of multiracial institutions and mechanisms. Civic Culture and Urban Change summarizes the "solution sets" Dallas employs in dealing with major issues, and discusses the implications of those findings for the future of effective democracy in Dallas and other large cities.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Urban Regimes and Change
3
The City That Invented Itself
15
The Transformation of the Dallas Economy
31
Economic Structure Demography
46
Twilight of the Garchs
57
The Managerial Regency
73
Public Education in Dallas
81
Redesigning Policing
136
The Private Uses of Public Powers
241
The Capacity to Learn and Adapt
250
The Phantom Publics of Dallas
259
Race Representation and Legitimacy
286
How Dallas Solves Problems
323
Reflections
356
Notes
389
Bibiliography
425

The Dallas Growth
175
Making Development Policy the Dallas Way
199

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Royce Hanson is Professor of Practice in Policy Sciences at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Bibliographic information