The Early Life of Abraham Lincoln: Containing Many Unpublished Documents and Unpublished Reminiscences of Lincoln's Early Friends (Google eBook)

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S.S. McClure, 1896 - Presidents - 240 pages
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Page 167 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted : Provided always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed, and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 131 - I was born, and have ever remained, in the most humble walks of life. I have no wealthy or popular relations or friends to recommend me. My case is thrown exclusively upon the independent voters of the county; and, if elected, they will have conferred a favor upon me for which I shall be unremitting in my labors to compensate. But, if the good people in their wisdom shall see fit to keep me in the background, I have been too familiar with disappointments to be very much chagrined.
Page 129 - Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in. That every man may receive at least a moderate education, and thereby be enabled to read the histories of his own and other countries, by which he may duly appreciate the value of our free institutions, appears to be an object of vital importance...
Page 69 - ... to the rule of three. If a straggler supposed to understand Latin happened to sojourn in the neighborhood, he was looked upon as a wizard. There was absolutely nothing to excite ambition for education. Of course, when I came of age I did not know much. Still, somehow, I could read, write, and cipher to the rule of three, but that was all.
Page 70 - May I be pardoned if, upon this occasion, I mention that away back in my childhood, the earliest days of my being able to read, I got hold of a small book, such a one as few of the younger members have ever seen, Weems
Page 154 - I remember just how those men looked," said Lincoln, "as we rode up the little hill where their camp was. The red light of the morning sun was streaming upon them as they lay heads towards us on the ground. And every man had a round red spot on the top of his head about as big as a dollar, where the redskins had taken his scalp. It was frightful, but it was grotesque; and the red sunlight seemed to paint everything all over.
Page 70 - The crossing of the river; the contest with the Hessians; the great hardships endured at that time, all fixed themselves on my memory, more than any single revolutionary event ; and you all know, for you have all been boys, how these early impressions last longer than any others. I recollect thinking then, boy even though I was, that there must have been something more than common that these men struggled for.
Page 138 - Abraham joined a volunteer company, and, to his own surprise, was elected captain of it. He says he has not since had any success in life which gave him so much satisfaction. He went to the campaign, served near three months, met the ordinary hardships of such an expedition, but was in no battle. He now owns, in Iowa, the land upon which his own warrants for the service were located.
Page 138 - I could not for the life of me," said he, "remember the proper word of command for getting my company endwise, so that it could get through the gate; so as we came near I shouted: 'This company is dismissed for two minutes, when it will fall in again on the other side of the gate!
Page 129 - For my part, I desire to see the time when education, and by its means, morality, sobriety, enterprise and industry, shall become much more general than at present, and should be gratified to have it in my power to contribute something to the advancement of any measure which might have a tendency to accelerate the happy period.

References from web pages

The early life of Abraham Lincoln / Ida M. Tar
The title is:. The early life of Abraham Lincoln / Ida M. Tarbell ; assisted by J. mccan Davis ; new introd. by Paul M. Angle. ...
www.stjoseph.lib.mi.us:8000/ kcweb/ kcBibRecord?bid=+++73010532& generation=16153& record=1& webpages=Y& search=%2F%2Fw+ta...

Fido - Abraham Lincoln's Dog
This web page has information about Fido, Abraham Lincoln's pet dog
members.aol.com/ RVSNorton/ Lincoln17.html

Abraham Lincoln Research Site
This website includes a biography, photographs, and lots of information about Abraham Lincoln including my e-mail address to answer questions about his ...
chnm.gmu.edu/ digitalhistory/ links/ cached/ introduction/ link0.12.Lincoln.html

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Tarbell, Ida M. (Ida Minerva), 1857-1944 - The early life of Abraham Lincoln : containing many unpublished documents and unpublished reminiscences of ...
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The early life of Abraham Lincoln : containing many unpublished documents and unpublished reminiscences of Lincoln's early friends - Tarbell, ...
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