Lays of ancient Rome (Google eBook)

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843 - Rome - 190 pages
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Review: Lays of Ancient Rome

User Review  - Steven Walle - Goodreads

This is a group of 4 poems about certain battles of war. These poems were required reading and required memorization for Italian and English children. Very awesome imagery is depicted throughout this volume. Enjoy! Read full review

Review: Lays of Ancient Rome

User Review  - J. Gowin - Goodreads

As a collection of poetry its greatness is best shown by its wonderfull quotability. Read full review

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Page 60 - Then none was for a party ; Then all were for the state ; Then the great man helped the poor, And the poor man loved the great ; Then lands were fairly portioned ; Then spoils were fairly sold : The Romans were like brothers In the brave days of old.
Page 69 - But with a crash like thunder Fell every loosened beam, And like a dam the mighty wreck Lay right athwart the stream ; And a long shout of triumph Rose from the walls of Rome, As to the highest turret-tops Was splashed the yellow foam.
Page 65 - Then, whirling up his broadsword With both hands to the height, He rushed against Horatius, And smote with all his might. With shield and blade Horatius Right deftly turned the blow: The blow, though turned, came yet too nigh; It missed his helm, but gashed his thigh : The Tuscans raised a joyful cry To see the red blood flow.
Page 58 - To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his Gods...
Page 59 - Hew down the bridge, Sir Consul, With all the speed ye may; I, with two more to help me, Will hold the foe in play. In yon strait path a thousand May well be stopped by three: Now who will stand on either hand, And keep the bridge with me?" Then out spake Spurius Lartius, A Ramnian proud was he: "Lo, I will stand at thy right hand, And keep the bridge with thee.
Page 71 - Tiber! father Tiber! To whom the Romans pray, A Roman's life, a Roman's arms, Take thou in charge this day ! ' So he spake, and speaking sheathed The good sword by his side, And with his harness on his back Plunged headlong in the tide.
Page 61 - The Three stood calm and silent. And looked upon the foes. And a great shout of laughter From all the vanguard rose : And forth three chiefs came spurring Before that deep array; To earth they sprang, their swords they drew, And lifted high their shields, and flew To win the narrow way...
Page 73 - Curse on him!" quoth false Sextus " Will not the villain drown ? But for this stay, ere close of day We should have sacked the town ! " "Heaven help him!" quoth Lars Porsena, " And bring him safe to shore; For such a gallant feat of arms Was never seen before.
Page 57 - But when the face of Sextus Was seen among the foes, A yell that rent the firmament From all the town arose. On the house-tops was no woman But spat towards him and hissed, No child but screamed out curses, And shook its little fist.
Page 50 - The harvests of Arretium This year old men shall reap, This year young boys in Umbro Shall plunge the struggling sheep, And in the vats of Luna This year the must shall foam Round the white feet of laughing girls Whose sires have marched to Rome.

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