A Peep at Mexico: Narrative of a Journey Across the Republic from the Pacific to the Gulf in December 1873 and January 1974 (Google eBook)

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Trubner & Company, 1874 - Mexico - 353 pages
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Page 29 - Organo cactus, with its tree-like stem, often 2ft. in diameter, and loft, to 1 5 ft. high, sends up its stiff, straight branches to a height of 30 ft. or 40 ft. from the ground, whilst the smaller species mingle in thousands with the shrubs and bushes nearer the earth. Wherever the creepers may have neglected trunk or bough, prolific parasites, gay alike with taper leaf and gorgeous blossom, hasten to perform their part in this fairy work of nature. The' flowers have little scent, but their profusion...
Page 28 - ... creepers cling to every trunk and twine round every branch, connecting by a thousand wiry threads thickets, shrubs, and cacti, a massive bulwark of profuse vegetation, through which the axe alone can hew a way. The huge "organ cactus," with its tree-like stem, often two feet in diameter, and 10 to 15 feet high, sends up its stiff, straight branches to a height of 30 or 40 feet from the ground, whilst smaller species of the same tribe mingle in thousands with the shrubs and bushes nearer the earth....
Page 216 - The town is supplied with water by an aqueduct which brings it from a river about a mile and a half distant. In the part of the town occupied by Europeans the streets are of good width for a place in which wheeled vehicles are uh ' known, and are kept fairly clean.
Page 284 - French to all other normalities ; it is an old liking, which the late war has not destroyed, and hardly even diminished. The reasons for this are many. There exists a certain similarity of character between them ; they have been reared in the same religion ; and last, but not least...
Page 271 - In the paseo stands a recently-erected monument to Guatemozin, the last of the Aztec sovereigns. It is a colossal bust, supported by a square pedestal, which on the side facing the city bears an inscription in Spanish, and on the opposite one the translation of it in old Mexican.
Page 260 - ... branch of the tree, the remainder droops in long straight festoons. Its popular name, heno (hay), conveys the best possible description of the effect it produces on the view...
Page 220 - This main street is a very wide, tolerably well-paved road, overarched on both sides by rows of beautiful trees, under the shade of which the people were comfortably installed in numerous benches. The houses are gaily painted, perhaps to excess in many instances, but rendering the town peculiarly pleasing.
Page 285 - Mexican, whose vanity is easily tickled by these demonstrative though insincere formalities. When questioned as to their fondness for the French, Mexicans will tell you repeatedly that un Frances...
Page 24 - ... variety in the vegetation ; mangroves monopolise all available space." The stagnant waters he describes as covered with a brownish green slime, disturbed occasionally by an alligator. " Some spots were literally crowded with numerous varieties of ducks and teal. . . . Their cackling would often alarm a company of huge white cranes, quietly congregated on a sandbank. . . . " On the floating islands, proud storks and sedate melancholy herons were engaged in catching and consuming their breakfast,...
Page 109 - Acatlau, the fearful road leads up a hill, from the top of which an extensive view is obtained of the surrounding country.

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