The Minds of the West: Ethnocultural Evolution in the Rural Middle West, 1830-1917

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Feb 1, 1999 - History - 442 pages
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In the century preceding World War I, the American Middle West drew thousands of migrants both from Europe and from the northeastern United States. In the American mind, the region represented a place where social differences could be muted and a distinct
  

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Contents

The Prospects of the West A Promise and a Threat
25
The Burden of Their Song Immigrant Encounters with the Republic
51
Well Meet on Canaans Land Patterns of Migration
79
EIJM1I 4 You Cant Put All Your Horses in One Corral Conflict and Community
103
Farming Is a Hard Life Household and the Agricultural Workplace
135
A Tale of Two Households Patterns of Family
159
Mothers and Siblings among the Corn Rows The Individual Life Course and Community Development
187
The Society
205
They Soon Abandoned Their Wooden Shoes Ethnic Group Formation
225
Teach the Children Domestic Economy Conceptions of Family Community and State
251
So Great Is Now the Spirit of Foreign Nationality LateNineteenthCentury Political Conflict
283
Epilogue
319
Notes
327
Index
411
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Page 4 - New England stood for a special English movement Puritanism. The Middle region was less English than the other sections. It had a wide mixture of nationalities, a varied society, the mixed town and county system of local government, a varied economic life, many religious sects. In short, it was a region mediating between New England and the South, and the East and the West. It represented...

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About the author (1999)

Jon Gjerde, author of the award-winning From Peasants to Farmers, is professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley.

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