The Vicar of Wakefield: A Tale (Google eBook)

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1823
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This book is a collection which does contain the Vicar of Wakefield, but also contains several other books. The Google metadata appears to be a little sloppy here.

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Page 140 - He shall not drop," said my uncle Toby, firmly. " A-well-o'day, do what we can for him," said Trim, maintaining his point ; " the poor soul will die." " He shall not die, by G — ," cried my uncle Toby. The accusing spirit, which flew up to heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in ; and the recording angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Page 341 - He must divest himself of the prejudices of his age or country ; he must consider right and wrong in their abstracted and invariable state; he must disregard present laws and opinions, and rise to general and transcendental truths, which will always be the same.
Page 292 - The wondering neighbours ran, And swore the dog had lost his wits, To bite so good a man. The wound it seem'd both sore and sad To every Christian eye ; And while they swore the dog was mad, They swore the man would die. But soon a wonder came to light, That show'd the rogues they lied, The man recover'd of the bite, The dog it was that died.
Page 283 - that we know, but where is the horse?' 'I have sold him,' cried Moses, 'for three pounds five shillings and two-pence.' 'Well done, my good boy,' returned she, 'I knew you would touch them off. Between ourselves, three pounds five shillings and two-pence is no bad day's work. Come, let us have it then.
Page 141 - ... was something in his looks, and voice, and manner, superadded, which eternally beckoned to the unfortunate to come and take shelter under him ; so that before my uncle Toby had half finished the kind offers he was making to the father, had the son insensibly pressed up close to his knees, and had taken hold of the breast of his coat, and was pulling it towards him.
Page 282 - As I had some opinion of my son's prudence, I was willing enough to entrust him with this commission ; and the next morning I perceived his sisters mighty busy in fitting out Moses for the fair ; trimming his hair, brushing his buckles, and cocking his hat with pins. The business of the toilet being over, we had at last the satisfaction of seeing him mounted upon the colt, with a deal box before him to bring home groceries in.
Page 367 - THE DANGEROUS PREVALENCE OF IMAGINATION. " DISORDERS of intellect," answered Imlac, " happen much more often than superficial observers will easily believe. Perhaps, if we speak with rigorous exactness, no human mind is in its right state. There is no man whose imagination does not sometimes predominate over his reason, who can regulate his attention wholly by his will, and whose ideas will come and go at his command. No man will be found in whose mind airy notions do not sometimes tyrannize, and...
Page 338 - I should with great alacrity teach them all to fly. But •what would be the security of the good, if the bad could at pleasure invade them from the sky ? Against an army sailing through the clouds, neither walls, nor mountains, nor seas, could afford any security. A flight of northern savages might hover in the wind, and light at once with irresistible violence upon the capital of a fruitful region that was rolling under them.
Page 358 - I will not undertake to maintain, against the concurrent and unvaried testimony of all ages and of all nations. There is no people, rude or learned, among whom apparitions of the dead are not related and believed. This opinion, which perhaps prevails as far as human nature is diffused, could become universal only by its truth : those that never heard of one another, would not have agreed in a tale which nothing but experience can make credible. That it is doubted by single cavillers, can very little...
Page 141 - The blood and spirits of Le Fevre, which were waxing cold and slow within him, and were retreating to their last citadel, the heart, — rallied back, — the film forsook his eyes for a moment ; — he looked up wishfully in my uncle Toby's face ; — then cast a look upon his boy ; — and that ligament, fine as it was, — was never broken. — Nature instantly ebbed again ; — the film returned to its place ; — the pulse fluttered, — stopped, — went on, — throbbed, — stopped again,...

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