Christ Church, Philadelphia: The Nation's Church in a Changing City (Google eBook)

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DIANE Publishing Inc., 1995 - Religion - 425 pages
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Marking the tercentenary of "the Nation's church" and one of Philadelphia's most treasured colonial institutions, Christ Church, Philadelphia chronicles the church's history from its founding in 1695 through three centuries of change. The fascinating story of Christ Church is intertwined with that of the development of Philadelphia as a major city, emphasizing the bond forged between the church and the neighborhood surrounding it. From its panoramic perspective, Christ Church, Philadelphia unfolds events as both religious and local history.
Established as the church of the English crown in a decidedly Quaker colony, Christ Church dealt from its inception with issues of religious freedom. Demonstrating as much political as religious daring, Philadelphia Anglicans emerged from the Revolution with positions of power and influence that earned them the leading role in forming the nation's Protestant Episcopal Church.
Gough's superbly researched, richly illustrated history details how the Christ Church congregation faced numerous religious and secular challenges over the next two hundred years - including evangelical religion, antebellum reforms, the Anglo-Catholic movement, the Social Gospel movement, liberal social reforms, and a rapidly shifting population within Philadelphia's center city. Bold leadership kept the "old city" church viable until the Society Hill restorations of the 1950s ensured its preservation. Today, the church continues to play a vital role in the life of one of the nation's most cosmopolitan, diverse cities. Christ Church, Philadelphia offers general readers and scholars alike a privileged view into the past and present of a city and of a national landmark.
  

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Contents

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XIII
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Page 206 - Mary P. Ryan, Cradle of the Middle Class: The Family in Oneida County, New York, 1790-1865 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981); Nancy A.
Page 170 - Billy White" (so she continued to call him) " was born a bishop. I never could persuade Him to play any thing but church. He would tie his own or my apron round his neck, for a gown, and stand behind a low chair, which he called his pulpit ; I, seated before him on a little bench, was the congregation ; and he always preached to me about being good. One day...
Page 131 - Draw out also the spear, and stop the way against them that persecute me : say unto my soul, I am thy salvation.
Page 402 - An Appeal to the Public in behalf of the Church of England in America...
Page 184 - America, in the persons of the Right Rev. William White, DD, Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of Pennsylvania ; the Right Rev. Samuel Provoost, DD, Bishop of the said Church in the State of New York, and the Right Rev.
Page 173 - In the tie which binds you to the Episcopal church, there is nothing which places you in the attitude of hostility to men of any other Christian denomination, and much which should unite you in affection to those occupied in the same cause with yourselves.
Page 336 - Our government makes no sense unless it is founded on a deeply felt religious faith and I don't care what it is
Page 133 - Inhabitants entitled, as well as their Brethren in England, to the Right of granting their own Money; and that every Attempt to deprive them of this Right, will either be found abortive in the End, or attended with Evils which would infinitely outweigh all the Benefit to be obtained by it.
Page 155 - That no powers be delegated to a General Ecclesiastical Government, except such as cannot conveniently be exercised by the Clergy and Laity in their respective congregations.
Page 49 - It is the handsomest structure of the kind, that I ever saw in any part of the world ; uniting in the peculiar features of that species of architecture, the most elegant variety of forms, with the most chaste simplicity of combination.

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About the author (1995)

Deborah Mathias Gough is Director of Advising and Academic Testing at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

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