The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine (Google eBook)

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Richard Watson Gilder
Scribner & Company; The Century Company, 1894 - American literature
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Page 26 - At her feet he bowed he fell, he lay down at her feet he bowed, he fell where he bowed, there he fell down dead...
Page 638 - The assent of the States, in their sovereign capacity, is implied in calling a convention, and thus submitting that instrument to the people. But the people were at perfect liberty to accept or reject it; and their act was final. It required not the affirmance, and could not be negatived by the State governments. The Constitution, when thus adopted, was of complete obligation, and bound the State sovereignties.
Page 637 - The Union is much older than the Constitution. It was formed, in fact, by the Articles of Association in 1774. It was matured and continued by the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It was further matured, and the faith of all the then thirteen States expressly plighted and engaged that it should be perpetual, by the Articles of Confederation in 1778. And, finally, in 1787 one of the declared objects for ordaining and establishing the Constitution was "to form a more perfect Union.
Page 324 - War to the last he waged with all The tyrant canker-worms of earth ; Baron and duke, in hold and hall, Cursed the dark hour that gave him birth; He used Rome's harlot...
Page 324 - Cumae's cavern close, The cheeks, with fast and sorrow thin, The rigid front, almost morose, But for the patient hope within, Declare a life whose course hath been Unsullied still, though still severe; Which, through the wavering days of sin, Kept itself icy-chaste and clear. Not wholly such his haggard look When wandering once forlorn he strayed...
Page 612 - I go for all sharing the privileges of the government who assist in bearing its burdens. Consequently, I go for admitting all whites to the right of suffrage who pay taxes or bear arms (by no means excluding females).
Page 607 - Government is instituted for the common good ; for the protection, safety, prosperity and happiness of the people ; and not for the profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men ; Therefore the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government ; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity and happiness require it.
Page 240 - ... manners of a slave. Money and fine clothes could not mend these defects or cover them up; they only made them the more glaring and the more pathetic. The poor fellow could not endure the terrors of the white man's parlor, and felt at home and at peace nowhere but in the kitchen. The family pew was a misery to him, yet he could nevermore enter into the solacing refuge of the "nigger gallery" that was closed to him for good and all.
Page 159 - On the morrow he came back, a little boy. And his teacher (who was God) put him in a class a little higher, and gave him these lessons to learn: Thou shalt do no hurt to any living thing. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not cheat.
Page 240 - It is often the case that the man who can't tell a lie thinks he is the best judge of one. - Pudd'nhead Wilson's Calendar October 12. - The Discovery. - It was wonderful to find America, but it would have been more wonderful to miss it.

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