A compendious history of New England: exhibiting an interesting view of the first settlers of that country, their character, their sufferings, and their ultimate prosperity (Google eBook)

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C. Taylor, 1808 - New England - 207 pages
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Page 49 - He was unto them as a very lovely song of one that hath a pleasant voice, and can play well on an instrument." The people obtained liberty for him to preach. a lecture on one part of the sabbath, and on the other to aid an aged
Page 81 - Massachusetts plantation ; and on the south by the sea, and in longitude as the line of the Massachusetts colony running from east to •west, that is to say, from the said Narraganset Bay on the east, to the South Sea on the west part, with the islands thereunto belonging.
Page 151 - ordered and agreed, that for the time to come, no man shall be admitted to the freedom of this body politic, but such as are members of some of the churches within the limits of the same.
Page 22 - Gorges, •with thirty-four others and their successors, styling them," The council established at Plymouth, in the county of Devon, for the planting, ruling, ordering, and governing, of New England in America.
Page 31 - men said unto him, Behold, we be afraid here in Judah, how much more then if we come to Keilah against the armies of the Philistines ? Then David inquired of the Lord yet again. And the Lord answered him, and said, Arise, go down to Keilah; for I will deliver the Philistines into thine hand.
Page 16 - 1 \th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James, of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth : Anno Domini,
Page 16 - meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience: In witness whereof we have here
Page 7 - In this deplorable situation, with " joint consent," they resolved to go into the Low Countries, where, they heard, was freedom of religion for all men. Hard was their lot, to leave their dwellings, their lands, and relatives, to go they knew not whither, to obtain a living they knew not how. Having been employed
Page 81 - east by Narraganset river, commonly called Narraganset Bay, where the river falleth into the sea ; and on the north by the line of Massachusetts plantation ; and on the south by the sea, and in longitude as the line of the Massachusetts colony running from east to •west, that is to say, from the said
Page 154 - of his will, freely and unchangeably ordain whatsoever comes to pass. By the decree of God, for the manifestation of his glory, some men and angels are predestinated unto everlasting

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