Old and New, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Edward Everett Hale
Lee & Shepard, 1874 - Liberalism (Religion)
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Page 730 - Enlarged winds, that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 526 - We stand on a mountain pass in the midst of whirling snow and blinding mist, through which we get glimpses now and then of paths which may be deceptive. If we stand still we shall be frozen to death. If we take the wrong road we shall be dashed to pieces. We do not certainly know whether there is any right one. What must we do? 'Be strong and of good courage.' Act for the best, hope for the best, and take what comes. ... If death ends all, we cannot meet death better."* * Liberty, Equality, Fraternity,...
Page 134 - Memoires," and came to the passage which relates his father's death, the distressed position of the family, and the sudden inspiration by which he, then a mere boy, felt and made them feel that he would be everything to them would supply the place of all that they had lost.
Page 106 - This is the most magnificent movement of all. There is a dignity, a majesty, a sublimity, in this last effort of the patriots, that I greatly admire.
Page 132 - It would have been wholly inconsistent with my father's ideas of duty, to allow me to acquire impressions contrary to his convictions and feelings respecting religion: and he impressed upon me from the first, that the manner in which the world came into existence was a subject on which nothing was known: that the question, "Who made me?
Page 134 - During this time I was not incapable of my usual occupations. I went on with them mechanically, by the mere force of habit. I had been so drilled in a certain sort of mental exercise, that I could still carry it on when all the spirit had gone out of it.
Page 132 - I have a hundred times heard him say, that all ages and nations have represented their gods as wicked, in a constantly increasing progression, that mankind have gone on adding trait after trait till they reached the most perfect conception of wickedness which the human mind can devise, and have called this God, and prostrated themselves before it.
Page 101 - Friends ! Brethren ! Countrymen ! That worst of plagues, the detested TEA shipped for this port by the East India Company, is now arrived in the Harbor ; the Hour of Destruction, or manly opposition to the Machinations of Tyranny, stares you in the Face...
Page 770 - ... taxed. Aided by the free school, the greatest wealth and the highest honors and offices in this broad land are within the reach of the sons of the humblest workman. THE PROPERTY SHOULD EDUCATE THE CHILDREN. The American doctrine is, that " the property of the State shall educate the children of the State" This benefiti equally the rich and the poor.
Page 134 - I bought a cottage as close as possible to the place where she is buried, and there her daughter (my fellowsufferer and now my chief comfort) and I, live constantly during a great portion of the year. My objects in life are solely those which were hers ; my pursuits and occupations those in which she shared, or sympathized, and which are indissolubly associated with her. Her memory is to me a religion, and her approbation the standard by which, summing up as it does all worthiness, I endeavour to...

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