History of the parish of Wraysbury, Ankerwycke priory, and Magna charta island [&c.]. (Google eBook)

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1862
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Page 281 - Hertford, fitted or to shine in courts With unaffected grace, or walk the plain With innocence and meditation join'd In soft assemblage, listen to my song, Which thy own Season paints ; when Nature all Is blooming and benevolent, like thee.
Page 55 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground •which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 239 - O NIGHTINGALE that on yon bloomy spray Warblest at eve, when all the woods are still, Thou with fresh hope the lover's heart dost fill, While the jolly hours lead on propitious May.
Page 215 - A Scotchman must be a very sturdy moralist who does not love Scotland better than truth : he will always love it better than inquiry ; and if falsehood flatters his vanity, will not be very diligent to detect it.
Page 271 - We happened to lye this night at the inn at Henley, where Shenstone wrote these lines, which I give as they are found in the corrected edition of his works, published after his death. In Dodsley's collection the stanza ran thus : — ' Whoe'er has travelled life's dull round, Whate'er his various tour has been, May sigh to think how oft he found His warmest welcome at an inn.
Page 271 - ... command what is in another man's house as if it were his own. Whereas at a tavern there is a general freedom from anxiety. You are sure you are welcome ; and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcomer you are. No servants will attend you with the alacrity which waiters do, who are incited by the prospect of an immediate reward in proportion as they please. No, sir, there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man by which so much happiness...
Page 108 - He preached the joys of Heaven and pains of Hell, And warned the sinner with becoming zeal, But on eternal mercy loved to dwell. He taught the Gospel rather than the Law And forced himself to drive, but loved to draw.
Page 128 - Registers is of the first class, and there is scarcely a claim of peerage or case of heirship on record, which has not been proved in part by them. At the dissolution of the monasteries, in the year 1535, the dispersion of the monks, who were, up to that period, the principal...
Page 50 - Who strives to mount Parnassus' hill, And thence poetic laurels bring, Must first acquire due force and skill, Must fly with swan's or eagle's wing. " Who Nature's treasures would explore, Her mysteries and arcana know, Must high as lofty Newton soar, Must stoop as delving Woodward low. " Who studies ancient laws and rites, Tongues, arts, and arms, and history, Must drudge, like Selden, days and nights, And in the endless labour die.
Page 200 - And understood not that a grateful mind By owing owes not, but still pays, at once Indebted and discharged...

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