The Pickwick Papers: By Charles Dickens

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MobileReference.com, 2008 - Electronic books - 688 pages
11 Reviews
The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. It was originally an idea by the illustrator Robert Seymour, although in his preface to the 1867 edition, Dickens strenuously denied this, writing that Mr Seymour never originated or suggested an incident, a phrase, or a word, to be found in the book.. At any event, Dickens was asked to contribute to the project as an up and coming writer following the success of Sketches by Boz, published in 1836. Dickens, supremely confident as ever, increasingly took over the unsuccessful monthly publication after Seymour had committed suicide. With the introduction of Sam Weller in chapter 10, the book became the first real publishing phenomenon, with bootleg copies, theatrical performances, Sam Weller joke books and other merchandise. OCo Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Intuitive navigation. . Text annotation and mark-up. ."

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Review: The Pickwick Papers

User Review  - Bre Cregor - Goodreads

A character in the TV miniseries adaptation of Elizabeth Gaskell's Cranford recommended his favorite Dickens' novel, THE PICKWICK PAPERS, and says, "I defy you not to roar!" This is when I KNEW I must ... Read full review

Review: The Pickwick Papers

User Review  - Brenda Cregor - Goodreads

A character in the TV miniseries adaptation of Elizabeth Gaskell's Cranford recommended his favorite Dickens' novel, THE PICKWICK PAPERS, and says, "I defy you not to roar!" This is when I KNEW I must ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s. His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

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