The annual necrology, for 1797-8;: including, also, various articles of neglected biography (Google eBook)

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Printed for R. Phillips, St. Paul's Church-yard., by, 1800 - Biography & Autobiography - 664 pages
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Page 467 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit : For a patriot, too cool ; for a drudge, disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient.
Page 26 - Immediately after leaving the King's Bench Prison, By the benefit of the Act of Insolvency, In consequence of which he registered His Kingdom of Corsica For the use of his Creditors.
Page 478 - Honor, justice, and humanity forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. We cannot endure the infamy and guilt of resigning succeeding generations to that wretchedness which inevitably awaits them, if we basely entail hereditary bondage upon them.
Page 444 - But for this child, I would lay my head on one of them, and never open my eyes again ! " With a heart feelingly alive to all the affections of my nature, I have never met with one softer than the stone that I would fain take for my last pillow.
Page 433 - I consider fidelity and constancy as two distinct things ; yet the former is necessary to give life to the other, and such a degree of respect do I think due to myself, that, if only probity, which is a good thing in its place, brings you back, never return ! for if a wandering of the heart, or even a caprice of the imagination detains you, there is an end of all my hopes of happiness. I could not forgive it if I would.
Page 293 - ... evidence, the diforder of his imagination. To prevent, therefore, ill-intentioned perfons from giving him any trouble, or from making ufe of his name or orders to difturb the public tranquillity, we gave him a guard, and placed about his perfon two officers of the garrifon, in whofe fidelity and integrity we could confide. Thefe officers were captain...
Page 467 - Here lies our good Edmund, whose genius was such, We scarcely can praise it, or blame it too much ; Who, born for the Universe, narrow'd his mind, And to party gave up what was meant for mankind.
Page 148 - Nor drum was heard, nor trumpet's angry sound, Nor swords were forged ; but, void of care and crime, The soft creation slept away their time. The teeming earth, yet guiltless of the plough, And unprovoked, did fruitful stores allow...
Page 448 - I shall be at peace. When you receive this, my burning head will be cold. I would encounter a thousand deaths, rather than a night like the last. Your treatment has thrown my mind into a state of chaos ; yet I am serene. I go to find comfort, and my only fear is, that my poor body will be insulted by an endeavour to recall my hated existence.
Page 437 - When you first entered into these plans, you bounded your views to the gaining of a thousand pounds. It was sufficient to have procured a farm in America, which would have been an independence. You find now that you did not know yourself, and that a certain situation in life is more necessary to you than you imagined more necessary than an uncorrupted heart.

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