The invention of Morel

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New York Review Books, Aug 31, 2003 - Fiction - 103 pages
37 Reviews
Jorge Luis Borges declared The Invention of Morel a masterpiece of plotting, comparable to The Turn of The Screw and Journey to the Center of the Earth. Set on a mysterious island, Bioy's novella is a story of suspense and exploration, as well as a wonderfully unlikely romance, in which every detail is at once crystal clear and deeply mysterious.

Inspired by Bioy Casares's fascination with the movie star Louise Brooks, The Invention of Morel has gone on to live a secret life of its own. Greatly admired by Julio Cortázar, Gabriel García Márquez, and Octavio Paz, the novella helped to usher in Latin American fiction's now famous postwar boom. As the model for Alain Resnais and Alain Robbe-Grillet's Last Year in Marienbad, it also changed the history of film.

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Review: The Invention of Morel

User Review  - Carrie Morales - Goodreads

It is almost impossible for me to write a true and honest review of this Masterpiece without talking a little about myself as a reader, in first place. I am the most critical, cynical and skeptical ... Read full review

Review: The Invention of Morel

User Review  - Carolina Morales - Goodreads

It is almost impossible for me to write a true and honest review of this Masterpiece without talking a little about myself as a reader, in first place. I am the most critical, cynical and skeptical ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Adolfo Bioy Casares has collaborated with Jorge Luis Borges on a number of works. They compiled Anthology of Fantastic Literature (1940), a documentation of the development of Spanish American suprarealism, and Six Problems for Don Isidro Parodi (1981), a playful and inventive variation on the theme of the detective who cannot visit the scene of the crime. Bioy Casares's numerous works are characterized by intelligence and a sense of playful fantasy. The Invention of Morel (1953), concerns a scientist's illusions about immortality. Asleep in the Sun is a bizarre tale written in an epistolary form. Ultimately the recipient of the letter is left to wonder whether, in fact, the puzzle has any solution or whether, like much of Bioy Casares's and Borges's work, it is an inside joke between author and reader.

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