The Muqaddimah : an introduction to history ; in three volumes

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Princeton University Press, 1967 - History - 1744 pages
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The first complete English translation of the introduction to a history of the world by the 14th-century Islamic scholar and statesman Ibn Khaldūn.

  

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User Review  - ajdeus - LibraryThing

The Muqaddimah is a pleasurable read for experts with many surprises (in the background/sidelines). Rosenthal's bracket fillers are sometimes annoying and misleading. Khaldun finished the work in 1377 ... Read full review

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User Review  - cdp02005 - LibraryThing

The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History (Bollingen Series (General)) by Ibn Khaldun (2004) Read full review

Contents

methods of instruction The conditions that obtain
3
sions dialectics and controversial questions
23
of the resulting dogmatic schools among both the orthodox and
55
21 Astronomy
133
connections
214
philosophy
246
31 A refutation of astrology The weakness of its achievements
258
its existence The harm that arises from practicing it
267
than the native speaker of Arabic to acquire the sciences
315
from the languages of the Mudar and the Himyar
344
dependent language different from the language of the Mudar
351
cording to the technical terminology of literary critics An explanation
358
52 The division of speech into poetry and prose
368
good quality of the linguistic habit is the result of the good quality
392
Q57 An explanation of the meaning of natural and contrived
398
58 People of rank are above cultivating poetry
410

and that alone are to be considered valid
284
subjects is detrimental to the process of instruction
290
their problems should not be treated in detail
298
of knowledge and meeting the authoritative teachers of his time
307
The Spanish muwashshahahs and zajab
440
Concluding Remark
481
Addenda 1966
512
Copyright

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About the author (1967)

Called the Father of the Philosophy of History and the Father of Sociology, Ibn Khaldun is considered the first and one of the greatest philosophers of history. Born in Muslim Spain and educated in Tunis, he served as a judge and a secretary in the service of rulers in both Spain and North Africa. In 1382 he moved to Egypt, where he became chief judge of Cairo and a lecturer at the Azhar Mosque University. In 1400 he accompanied the Egyptians on their campaign against the Mongol warrior Tamerlane and played a role in the arrangements for the surrender of Damascus. Ibn Khaldun gained much recognition for his seven-volume work on universal history, Kitab al-Ibar (Book of Lessons). In the work, focused mostly on the Muslim world, Ibn Khaldun attempts to treat history as a science. He made his most important contribution in the first part of the work, Muqaddimah (The Introduction), in which he outlines his philosophy of history, analyzing causes of events and setting social, geographic, and economic contexts for historical changes.

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