ENGLISH DRAMAMTIC POETRY (Google eBook)

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1879
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Page 495 - From jigging veins of rhyming mother wits, And such conceits as clownage keeps in pay, We'll lead you to the stately tent of War...
Page 496 - I'll ride in golden armour like the sun ; And in my helm a triple plume shall spring, Spangled with diamonds, dancing in the air, To note me emperor of the three-fold world...
Page 333 - Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
Page 197 - ... mace on his shoulder, the other in red, with a drawn sword in his hand, and leaning with the other hand upon the other's shoulder, and so they two went along in a soft pace, round about by the skirt of the stage, till at last they came to the cradle...
Page 334 - And do they not know that a tragedy is tied to the laws of poesy, and not of history; not bound to follow the story, but having liberty either to feign a quite new matter, or to frame the history to the most tragical conveniency ? Again, many things may be told which cannot be showed, if they know the difference betwixt reporting and representing.
Page 44 - Queen's most excellent Majesty by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons in this present Parliament assembled and by authority of the same...
Page 333 - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster, with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave. While in the meantime two armies fly in, represented with four swords and bucklers, and then what hard heart will not receive it for a pitched field?
Page 462 - A Pleasant Conceited Historie called the Taming of a Shrew, as it was sundry times acted by the Right honorable the Earle of Pembrook his servants...
Page 500 - Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 518 - Go, take the villain: soldiers, come away; We'll make quick work. Commend me to your master, My friend, and tell him that I watch'd it well. Come, let thy shadow parley with King Edward. Gav. Treacherous earl, shall I not see the king? War. The king of heaven perhaps, no other king.

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