The Green Fairy Book

Front Cover
Andrew Lang
Courier Dover Publications, 1965 - Juvenile Fiction - 366 pages
21 Reviews
It is almost impossible to envision what childhood would be like without the enchanting world of fairyland. Princess Rosanella, The Three Bears, giants and dwarfs, monsters and magicians, fairies and ogres — these are the companions who thrill young boys and girls of all lands and all times, as Andrew Lang's phenomenally successful collections of stories have proved. From the day that they were first printed, the Lang fairy tale books of many colors have entertained thousands of boys and girls, as they have also brought pleasure to the many parents who have read these unforgettable classics to their children. In the Green Fairy Book, the third in the series, Lang has assembled stories from Spanish and Chinese traditions, a few of the most entertaining creations penned by the Comte de Caylus, others by Sebillot, Fenelon, Kletke, and Mme. d'Aulnoy, and, of course, some of the best-loved tales from the Brothers Grimm. Here in one attractive paperbound volume with enlarged print are "The Blue Bird," "Sylvain and Jocosa," "Narcissus and the Princess Potentilla," "The Three Little Pigs," "The Half-Chick," and many other favorites that have become an indispensable part of our cultural heritage.
All in all, this collection contains forty-two stories, all narrated in the clear, lively prose for which Lang was famous. Not only are Lang's translations generally conceded to be the best English versions of standard stories, his collections are the richest and widest in range. His position as one of England's foremost folklorists as well as his first-rate literary abilities make his collections unmatchable in the English language.
  

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Review: The Green Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #2)

User Review  - Artnoose Noose - Goodreads

One of my favorite spots to nurse is a corner in the children's section of the main library in town. There's a chair, and it faces a corner with science books on one wall and fairy stories on the ... Read full review

Review: The Green Fairy Book (Coloured Fairy Books #2)

User Review  - Elinor Loredan - Goodreads

I love most of the first several stories. The characters are interesting, plots clever, magic enchanting, humor effective, and endings satisfying: The Blue Bird The Story of Caliph Stork Rosanella ... Read full review

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Contents

I
1
II
27
III
32
IV
43
V
48
VI
56
VII
64
VIII
68
XXII
222
XXIII
229
XXIV
234
XXV
238
XXVI
262
XXVII
271
XXVIII
276
XXIX
282

IX
85
X
100
XI
106
XII
137
XIII
145
XIV
151
XV
157
XVI
175
XVII
180
XVIII
186
XIX
194
XX
202
XXI
216
XXX
286
XXXI
290
XXXII
296
XXXIII
304
XXXIV
311
XXXV
319
XXXVI
324
XXXVII
328
XXXVIII
339
XXXIX
343
XL
353
XLI
360
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Andrew Lang was born at Selkirk in Scotland on March 31, 1844. He was a historian, poet, novelist, journalist, translator, and anthropologist, in connection with his work on literary texts. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, St. Andrews University, and Balliol College, Oxford University, becoming a fellow at Merton College. His poetry includes Ballads and Lyrics of Old France (1872), Ballades in Blue China (1880--81), and Grass of Parnassus (1888--92). His anthropology and his defense of the value of folklore as the basis of religion is expressed in his works Custom and Myth (1884), Myth, Ritual and Religion (1887), and The Making of Religion (1898). He also translated Homer and critiqued James G. Frazer's views of mythology as expressed in The Golden Bough. He was considered a good historian, with a readable narrative style and knowledge of the original sources including his works A History of Scotland (1900-7), James VI and the Gowrie Mystery (1902), and Sir George Mackenzie (1909). He was one of the most important collectors of folk and fairy tales. His collections of Fairy books, including The Blue Fairy Book, preserved and handed down many of the better-known folk tales from the time. He died of angina pectoris on July 20, 1912.

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