Judgment in Managerial Decision Making

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Wiley, 1998 - Business & Economics - 200 pages
5 Reviews
Can You Really Improve Your Judgment and Decision-Making Ability? Situations requiring careful judgment are continually facing you throughout your daily lives and are a major component of managerial work at all levels of the corporate ladder. In any organization, this constitutes a critical human resource for the firm. While to some extent, judgment may be considered an innate ability, it is generally believed that training can offer significant improvement on the quality of managerial judgment. Judgment in Managerial Decision Making provides that training to students by creating an awareness of the decision-making process, by allowing students to change their decision-making processes, and by offering strategies for improving these processes so that they become part of the readerís permanent behavior. Re-written as a result of feedback from both colleagues and students, the fourth edition of this classic book provides even more interesting and contemporary examples of real-world decisions. This edition includes a new chapter on motivational biases (chapter 6), which examines how our motivations affect the rationality of our thoughts, and examines managerial decision-making from both individual and multi-party perspectives. By making use of these chapters, the individual can make permanent improvements to future decisions.

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Review: Judgement In Managerial Decision Making

User Review  - Jennifer - Goodreads

Every chapter was useful in every day business. A book (and personal notes) to keep handy. Highly recommend for Business Decision Makers. Read full review

Review: Judgement In Managerial Decision Making

User Review  - Arsalan Khan - Goodreads

Good for anyone trying to understand the biases that we all carry. Read full review

Contents

Introduction to Managerial Decision Making
2
Biases
11
Judgment under Uncertainty
42
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Max H. Bazerman is the J. J. Gerber Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations and Margaret A. Neale is the H. L. and Helen Kellogg Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations at the J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. They are co-authors of "Cognition and Rationality in Negotiation" (Free Press, 1991).

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