History of Westchester County, New York: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Year 1900, Part 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
New York History Company, 1900 - Westchester County (N.Y.) - 638 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 249 - It is the best cause. It is the cause of liberty; and I make no doubt but your upright conduct, this day, will not only entitle you to the love and esteem of your fellow-citizens, but every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you...
Page 355 - Our situation is truly distressing. The check our detachment sustained on the 27th ultimo has dispirited too great a proportion of our troops and filled their minds with apprehension and despair. The militia, instead of calling forth their utmost efforts to a brave and manly opposition in order to repair our losses, are dismayed, intractable, and impatient to return. Great numbers of them have gone off in some instances almost by whole regiments, by half ones, and by companies at a time.
Page 33 - They were admitted to be the rightful occupants of the soil, with a legal as well as just claim to retain possession of it, and to use it according to their own discretion ; but their rights to complete sovereignty, as independent nations, were necessarily diminished, and their power to dispose of the soil at their own will, to whomsoever they pleased, was denied by the original fundamental principle, that discovery gave exclusive title to those who made it.
Page 331 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs, has been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general.
Page 36 - BROTHERS : You remember when you first came over the great waters, I was great and you was little, very small. I then took you in for a friend, and kept you under my arms, so that no one might injure you ; since that time we have ever been true friends ; there has never been any quarrel between us. But now our conditions are changed. You are become great and tall.
Page 52 - After proceeding one hundred leagues, we found a very pleasant situation among some steep hills, through which a very large river, deep at its mouth, forced its way to the sea ; from the sea to the estuary of the river, any ship heavily laden might pass, with the help of the tide, which rises eight feet. But as we were riding at anchor in a good berth, we would not venture up in our vessel, without a knowledge of...
Page 249 - ... every man who prefers freedom to a life of slavery will bless and honor you as men who have baffled the attempt of tyranny, and, by an impartial and uncorrupt verdict, have laid a noble foundation for securing to ourselves, our posterity, and our neighbors that to which nature and the laws of our country have given us a right the liberty both of exposing and opposing arbitrary power (in these parts of the world, at least) by speaking and writing truth.
Page 32 - This principle was that discovery gave title to the government by whose subjects, or by whose authority, It was made, against all other European governments, which title might be consummated by possession.
Page 205 - Esq., or, in his absence, to such as for the time being take care for preserving the peace and administering the laws in their Majesties' province of New York, in America.
Page 211 - Parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their late Majesties King William and Queen Mary, intituled An Act declaring the rights and liberties of the Subject and settling the Succession of the Crown...

Bibliographic information