Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis

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Columbia University Press, 2001 - History - 263 pages
29 Reviews

What are the causes of war? To answer this question, Professor Waltz examines the ideas of major thinkers throughout the history of Western civilization. He explores works both by classic political philosophers, such as St. Augustine, Hobbes, Kant, and Rousseau, and by modern psychologists and anthropologists to discover ideas intended to explain war among states and related prescriptions for peace.

  

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Review: Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis

User Review  - Jennifer Taw - Goodreads

Waltz's logical, step by step analysis of why war and peace are best understood at the systemic level of analysis and the basis for his later, starker, neorealism. Read full review

Review: Man, the State, and War: A Theoretical Analysis

User Review  - Raj Agrawal - Goodreads

[This is a snapshot of my thoughts on this book after just finishing it. This is not meant to serve as a summary or a critique only as some words on how I engaged with this book for the purposes of ... Read full review

Contents

I INTRODUCTION
xvii
International Conflict and Human Behavior
14
The Behavioral Sciences and the Reduction of Interstate Violence
40
International Conflict and the Internal Structure of States
78
International Socialism and the Coming of the First World War
122
International Conflict and International Anarchy
157
Examples from Economics Politics and History
185
VIII CONCLUSION
222
BIBLIOGRAPHY
237
INDEX
251
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Kenneth N. Waltz is a recipient of the James Madison Award for distinguished scholarly contributions to political science from the American Political Science Association. He is Ford Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, and is now at the Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. He is the author of Foreign Policy and Democratic Politics, Theory of International Politics, and coauthor of The Spread of Nuclear Weapons.

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