An Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of James I. and Charles I. and of the Lives of Oliver Cromwell and Charles II...: From Original Writers and State-papers, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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F.C. and J. Rivington, 1814
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Page 292 - Thus much I should perhaps have said though I were sure I should have spoken only to trees and stones; and had none to cry to, but with the Prophet, O earth, earth, earth!
Page 250 - Where is this goodly Tower of a Commonwealth, which the English boasted they would build to overshadow Kings, and be another Rome in the West...
Page 208 - And shall subscribe a profession of their Christian belief in these words I, AB, profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ, his Eternal Son, the true God, and in the Holy Spirit, one God, blessed for evermore ; and do acknowledge the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by divine inspiration.
Page 335 - God of our fathers ! what is Man, That thou towards him with hand so various Or might I say contrarious?
Page 93 - And he brought forth the king's son, and put the crown upon him, and gave him the testimony; and they made him king, and anointed him; and they clapped their hands, and said, God save the king.
Page 382 - ... a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom, and that we shall be ready to consent to such an act of parliament as upon mature deliberation shall be offered to us for the full granting that indulgence.
Page 266 - consciences; and that no man shall be disquieted, or ' called in question, for differences of opinion in matters of c religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 290 - More just it is, doubtless, if it come to force, that a less number compel a greater to retain, which can be no wrong to them, their liberty, than that a greater number, for the pleasure of their baseness, compel a less most injuriously to be their fellow- slaves.
Page 158 - Brussels, he never seemed to lay anything to heart. He pursued all his diversions and irregular pleasures in a free career, and seemed to be as serene under the loss of a crown as the greatest philosopher could have been.
Page 198 - I trust, my past Carriage hitherto hath manifested my Acquiescence in the Will and Disposition of God ; and that I love and value the Peace of this Commonwealth much above my own Concernments : And I Desire that by this a Measure of my future Deportment may be taken ; which thro...

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