The Art of the Heist (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Apr 21, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 304 pages
15 Reviews

From New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, to the Smithsonian Institution in D.C., to Boston's Museum of Fine Art, to dozens of regional museums throughout the United States, no museum was off-limits to leg­endary art thief Myles Connor. He has used every technique in the book, from breaking and entering, to cat burglary, to false identities and elaborate con jobs. He once even grabbed a Rembrandt off a wall in broad daylight and simply ran like hell. His IQ is at genius level, and his charm is legendary. The fact that he was in jail at the time of the famous robbery of the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum—which remains the largest art theft in American history—has not stopped the FBI from considering him a top suspect in that still unsolved robbery.

How did the son of a decorated policeman grow up to become one of Boston's most notorious criminals? How did he survive a decades-long feud with the Boston police and the FBI? How did he manage to escape one jail sentence with a simple fake gun carved out of soap? How did he trade the return of a famous Rembrandt in exchange for early release from another sentence?

The Art of the Heist is a roller-coaster ride of a life, by a man who was drawn to misadventure at every turn. As a promising young rock star, Myles Connor started collecting Japanese swords and weapons. Soon his collection expanded through less than legitimate means, and his education in European masters and modern artists accelerated. Disguised as an art collector, he spent time in the archives of museums far and wide, and visited after hours to take advantage of what he learned by day.

Along the way, he robbed banks, warehouses, trailers, and estate homes. He engaged in rooftop shootouts with the police. He walked the streets of Boston in disguise while dozens of policemen were out searching for him. The Art of the Heist is part confession, part thrill ride, and impossible to put down.

  

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Review: The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Thief

User Review  - Mary Rose - Goodreads

Of all the """true""" memoirs of conmen, thieves, and bank robbers, this might be one of my favorites. Connor is a likable thief, pragmatic and interesting. He talks about museum heists in a way that ... Read full review

Review: The Art of the Heist: Confessions of a Master Thief

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

It feels wrong to say that this book was entertaining and enjoyable (he was a criminal after all) but it was. As a whole, Myles' life was a waste spent in and out of prison, which is kind of sad, but ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
27
Section 4
39
Section 5
45
Section 6
55
Section 7
68
Section 8
76
Section 17
156
Section 18
166
Section 19
177
Section 20
186
Section 21
193
Section 22
203
Section 23
211
Section 24
221

Section 9
85
Section 10
98
Section 11
106
Section 12
115
Section 13
123
Section 14
134
Section 15
140
Section 16
151
Section 25
242
Section 26
247
Section 27
260
Section 28
266
Section 29
277
Section 30
287
Section 31
289
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Myles J. Connor grew up in Milton, Massachusetts, the son of a decorated policeman. During the 1960s and '70s he was the leader of a successful Boston rock-and-roll band, Myles and the Wild Ones. He robbed his first museum when he was twenty years old. Shortly after, he gained notoriety for his daring escape from a Maine jail, and for his involvement in a dramatic shoot-out with Boston police. Connor has planned and executed numerous bank robberies and museum heists, several of which are told here for the first time.

Coauthor Jenny Siler, the author of six novels, first met Myles in the fall of 2007. Together, Jenny and Myles have interviewed many eyewitnesses to the events described in the book. For help in reconstructing and corroborating Myles's story, Jenny has combed through numerous documents, including newspaper archives, police reports, court records, transcripts of FBI interviews, and personal correspondence.

Bibliographic information