The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr: Symbol of the movement, January 1957-December 1958

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University of California Press, 2000 - History - 670 pages
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Acclaimed by Ebony magazine as "one of those rare publishing events that generate as much excitement in the cloistered confines of the academy as they do in the general public", The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. chronicles one of the twentieth century's most dynamic personalities and one of the nation's greatest social struggles. King's call for racial justice and his faith in the power of nonviolence to engender a major transformation of American society is movingly conveyed in this authoritative, multivolume edition.

With the Montgomery bus boycott at an end, King confronts the sudden demands of celebrity while trying to identify the next steps in the burgeoning struggle for equality. Anxious to duplicate the success of the boycott, he spends much of 1957 and 1958 establishing the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. But advancing the movement in the face of dogged resistance proves disheartening for the young minister, and he finds that it is easier to inspire supporters with his potent oratory than to organize a mass movement for social change. Yet King remains committed: "The vast possibilities of a nonviolent, non-cooperative approach to the solution of the race problem are still challenging indeed. I would like to remain a part of the unfolding development of this approach for a few more years".

King's budding international prestige is affirmed in March 1957 when he attends the independence ceremonies in Ghana, West Africa. Two months later his first national address, at the "Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom", is widely praised, and in June 1958, King's increasing prominence is recognized with a long-overdue White House meeting. During this period King also cultivatesalliances with the labor and pacifist movements, and international anticolonial organizations. As Volume IV closes King is enjoying the acclaim that greeted his first book, Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story, only to suffer a near-fatal stabbing in New York City.

  

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Contents

Jan 1957 Facing the Challenge of a New Age Address
1
Introduction i
37
Apr 1958
42
Editorial Principles
57
List of Abbreviations
63
To Robert Johnson
97
Jan 1957 A Statement to the South and the Nation
103
Jan 1957 Oudine Address to MIA Mass Meeting
109
Sept 1957 From Richard M Nixon
277
Oct 1957 To Glenn E Smiley
290
Oct 1957 To Alfred Hassler
302
Nov 1957 To Marie F Rodell
314
Nov 1957 From Oliver Tambo
325
Dec 1957 To Archibald James Carey
343
o Feb 1958 Remarks for Negro Press Week
362
Feb 1958 To Eleanor Roosevelt
371

Jan 1957 To Dorothy M Steere
115
Feb 1957 For All A NonSegregated Society A Message
123
Feb 1957 To Dwight D Eisenhower
132
Feb 1957 From John Wesley Dobbs
138
Apr 1957 To Galal Kernahan
192
May 1958
197
May 1957 From Bayard Rustin
199
May 1957 To Bernard Shanley
205
May 1957 From Irene Dobbs Jackson
215
June 1957 Statement on Meeting with Richard M Nixon
222
June 1957 Remarks in Acceptance of the Fortysecond Spingarn Medal
228
July 1957 From Charles O Akuamoa
239
Aug 1957 Conquering SelfCenteredness Sermon
248
Aug 1957 From Medgar Wiley Evers
259
Aug 1957 To T Y Rogers
266
Mar 1958 To Nannie Helen Burroughs
378
Mar 1958 To Douglas E M00re
384
June 1958
389
Mar 1958 To Alberta Williams King
390
Advice for Living
443
Sept 1958 To E D Nixon
494
Sept 1958 From A J Muste
500
Oct 1958 From Herbert W Vilakazi
515
Nov 1958 To Bayard Rustin
530
Nov 1958 From Dwight D Eisenhower
535
Dec 1958 To Stanley D Levison
545
Dec 1958 To Gardner C Taylor
551
Calendar of Documents
555
Index
615
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Clayborne Carson is Director and Senior Editor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project. A history professor at Stanford University, he is the author of In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s (1981) and editor of Knock at Midnight: Inspiration from the Great Sermons of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. (1998) and Malcolm X: The FBI File (1991). Susan Carson, managing editor, holds an M.L.S. from San Jose State University. She joined the Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project in 1987 as the librarian and archivist. Adrienne Clay, assistant editor, is a graduate of Colby College. A participant in the 1996 King Summer Research Fellowship program, Adrienne joined the staff of the Project in 1997. Kieran Taylor, assistant editor, earned an M.A. in southern studies from the University of Mississippi. He worked as a reporter and community organizer before joining the Project in 1997. Virginia Shadron earned a Ph.D. in American studies from Emory University.

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