Dr. Grant and the mountain Nestorians (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Gould and Lincoln, 1853 - Religion - 418 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 131 - ON the mountain's top appearing, Lo ! the sacred herald stands, Welcome news to Zion bearing— Zion, long in hostile lands : Mourning captive ! God himself shall loose thy bands.
Page 99 - The chamber where the good man meets his fate Is privileged beyond the common walk Of virtuous life, quite in the verge of Heaven.
Page 165 - He that observeth the wind shall not sow; and he that regardeth the clouds shall not reap.
Page 50 - Christianity was successfully preached to the Bactrians, the Huns, the Persians, the Indians, the Persarmenians, the Medes, and the Elamites : the barbaric churches, from the Gulf of Persia to the Caspian Sea, were almost infinite ; and their recent faith was conspicuous in the number and sanctity of their monks and martyrs.
Page 21 - Whether ye eat or drink, or whatever ye do, do all to the glory of God.
Page 76 - He also that received seed among the thorns is he that heareth the word ; and the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, choke the word, and he becometh unfruitful.
Page 173 - Thou hast spread thy wing, and sheltered us from the pestilence that walketh in darkness, and the destruction that wasteth at noon-day.
Page 122 - Abulpharagius,130 primate of the East, so truly eminent both in his life and death. In his life he was an elegant writer of the Syriac and Arabic tongues, a poet, physician, and historian, a subtle philosopher, and a moderate divine. In his death his funeral was attended by his rival the Nestorian patriarch, with a train of Greeks and Armenians, who forgot their disputes, and mingled their tears over the grave of an enemy.
Page 52 - In a subsequent age the zeal of the Nestorians overleaped the limits which had confined the ambition and curiosity both of the Greeks and Persians. The missionaries of Balch and Samarcand pursued without fear the footsteps of the roving Tartar, and insinuated themselves into the camps of the valleys of Imaus and the banks of the Selinga.

Bibliographic information