Science: the glorious entertainment

Front Cover
Harper & Row, 1964 - Science - 322 pages
2 Reviews

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Science: The Glorious Entertainment.

User Review  - Aaron - Goodreads

Like every Barzun book I've read, this was filled with amazing insight into western society that I had never thought of or heard from another source. Like most good contrarians his thesis (on the ... Read full review

Review: Science: The Glorious Entertainment.

User Review  - Brent Barnard - Goodreads

I'm writing about this book, but actually I scanned about 10 Barzun books. He protests against a lot of modern decadence, but (disappointingly) without really having eternal standards to match against ... Read full review

Contents

To the Reader
1
One Culture Not Two
9
Love and Hatred of the Machine
31
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1964)

Jacques Barzun, a historian and cultural critic, is one of the most prolific and wide-ranging American writers of the twentieth century. Barzun was born in Greteil, France, in 1907. He came to the United States in 1920, entered Columbia University in 1923, and graduated magna cum laude in 1927. He joined Columbia's faculty in 1929 as an instructor while continuing his studies in graduate school there, earning a doctorate in French history in 1932. Barzin was been associated with Columbia University for more than forty years. He became a full professor in 1945, was dean of graduate faculties from 1955 to 1958, dean of faculties from 1958 to 1967, and one of the sponsors of the university's two-year Western Civilization course, featuring the great books of Western literature. He retired from Columbia University in 1975, but has continued to write extensively. The core of Barzun's work, which he has intended for both a general and an academic audience, is the importance of studying history to understand the present and a fundamental respect for intellect. Although he has written on subjects as diverse as detective fiction and baseball, he is especially known for his many books on music, nineteenth-century romanticism and education. His works include Darwin, Marx and Wagner: Critique of a Heritage (1941), Romanticism and the Modern Ego (1943); The House of Intellect (1956), Race: A Study in Superstition (1965), Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers (1976) A Stroll with William James (1983), and The Culture We Deserve (1989). All feature Barzun's broad scholarship, careful thinking, and clear, witty style.

Bibliographic information