Sea kings and naval heroes (Google eBook)

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Bell and Daldy, 1861 - 336 pages
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Page 301 - Vice-Admiral Lord Nelson has been commanded to spare Denmark, when she no longer resists. The line of defence which covered her shores has struck to the British flag: but if the firing is continued on the part of Denmark, he must set on fire all the prizes that he has taken, without having the power of saving the men who have so nobly defended them. The brave Danes are the brothers, and should never be the enemies, of the English.
Page 329 - my plan of attack, as far as a man dare venture to guess at the very uncertain position the enemy may be found in: but it is to place you perfectly at ease respecting my intentions, and to give full scope to your judgment for carrying them into effect. We can, my dear Coll, have no little jealousies. We have only one great object in view, that of annihilating our enemies, and getting a glorious peace for our country. No man has more confidence in another than I have in you; and no man will render...
Page 291 - Let me alone ; I have yet my legs left and one arm. Tell the surgeon to make haste and get his instruments. I know I must lose my right arm ; so the sooner it is off the better.
Page 110 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 126 - I, that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph, sometimes sitting in the shade like a goddess, sometimes singing like an angel, sometimes playing like Orpheus ; behold the sorrow of this world ! once amiss hath bereaved me of all.
Page 276 - If that be the case," said the father, "you certainly shall not go ; but make another attempt, and I will leave it to your honour. If the road is dangerous, you may return : but remember, boys, I leave it to your honour.
Page 328 - I send you my Plan of Attack, as far as a man dare venture to guess at the very uncertain position the Enemy may be found in. But, my dear friend, it is to place you perfectly at ease respecting my intentions, and to give full scope to your judgment for carrying them into effect.
Page 282 - with a feeling that I should never rise in my profession. My mind was staggered with a view of the difficulties I had to surmount, and the little interest I possessed. I could discover no means of reaching the object of my ambition.
Page 94 - Hereupon, the man, being influenced with ambition of glory and hopes of wealth, was so vehemently transported with desire to navigate that sea, that falling down there upon his knees, he implored the Divine assistance that he might, at some time or other, sail thither and make a perfect discovery of the same ; and hereunto he bound himself with a vow.
Page 278 - What,' said he in his answer, ' has poor Horatio done, who is so weak, that he, above all the rest, should be sent to rough it out at sea ? But let him come, and the first time we go into action a cannon ball may knock off his head, and provide for him at once.

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