Feather Woman of the Jungle

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City Lights Books, Jan 1, 1988 - Fiction - 132 pages
3 Reviews

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Review: Feather Woman of the Jungle

User Review  - Nancy - Goodreads

This is a collection of hero adventure tales similar to Sinbad and the Seven Seas. These 10 tales are related by the hero in his old age when he becomes chief to an ever-increasing number of villagers ... Read full review

Review: Feather Woman of the Jungle

User Review  - Trinie - Goodreads

Story collection by author who also wrote My Life In the Bush of Ghosts, about magic in the African bush. Scariest sections involve protagonist and his brother who are captured by the witch, turned into two-dimensional images, and flogged daily. Witch is half-bird, half-woman. Yay! Read full review

Contents

The Biography of My Town in Brief page
7
was Turned into the Image for Two Years
23
The Treacherous Queen and the King in
36
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Amos Tutuola was born in Abeokuta, Nigeria. He received his elementary education at a Salvation Army school and has lived mostly at Ibadan, where he was for a long time a messenger. His highly controversial reputation as a writer is based on his unique style, a type of pidgin English. Tutuola's most popular work so far is his romance, The Palm-Wine Drinkard (1952), an extremely imaginative tall tale drawn from Yoruba legends and myths about a journey into the land of the dead. Despite the controversy surrounding Tutuola's "wrong" use of English, his historical significance as a writer cannot be disputed. Among the first black African writers to be published and win some degree of international recognition, he was also the first writer to see the possibilities of translating African mythology into English in an imaginative way. For all the controversy, Tutuola is highly popular and his books have been translated into many languages.

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