Lonely Crusade: A Novel

Front Cover
Basic Books, 1997 - Fiction - 398 pages
5 Reviews
A classic of African-American fiction, Chester Himes's tale of a young black man who becomes a union organizer during WWII examines major problems in American life: racism, anti-Semitism, labor strife, and corruption.
  

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Review: Lonely Crusade

User Review  - Paddythemic - Goodreads

to me this read like a direct extension of "if he hollers...". has some very deep exposition on race, and alot of anachronistic unionism/communism references that were very ŕelevant when the book was ... Read full review

Review: Lonely Crusade

User Review  - Eric Stone - Goodreads

Yet another of my favorite Himes novels. Political and very tough. I like his earlier, more political novels like this one a lot better than his Harlem police novels. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
50
Section 2
97
Section 3
120
Section 4
129
Section 5
143
Section 6
151
Section 7
163
Section 8
227
Section 10
277
Section 11
335
Section 12
343
Section 13
357
Section 14
374
Section 15
384
Section 16
401
Copyright

Section 9
241

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About the author (1997)

Chester B. Himes was born in Jefferson City, Missouri on July 29, 1909. He attended Ohio State University in Columbus, but was expelled his freshman year for a prank. He began writing short stories and having them published in national magazines such as Abbott's Monthly Magazine and Esquire while in prison for armed robbery. He was paroled after 8 years and eventually joined the Works Progress Administration, where he served as a writer with the Ohio Writers' Project. His first novel, If He Hollers Let Him Go, is about the fear, anger, and humiliation of a black employee at a racist defense plant during World War II and was published in 1945. He moved to Paris, France in the 1950s and then to Moraira, Spain in 1969. He was more popular in Europe than in the United States and primarily wrote about black protagonists plagued by white racism and self-hate. His other works include Lonely Crusade, Pinktoes, Black on Black, The Quality of Hurt, and My Life As Absurdity. He also wrote detective novels set in Harlem, New York City including Run Man, Run, The Real Cool Killers, and Blind Man with a Pistol. He won the 1958 Grand Prix de Littérature Policière and the 1982 Columbus Foundation award. He died on November 12, 1984 from Parkinson's Disease.

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