The age of reform: from Bryan to F. D. R.

Front Cover
Knopf, 1955 - History - 328 pages
29 Reviews
This book is a landmark in American political thought. It examines the passion for progress and reform that colored the entire period from 1890 to 1940 -- with startling and stimulating results. it searches out the moral and emotional motives of the reformers the myths and dreams in which they believed, and the realities with which they had to compromise.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

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Review: The Age of Reform

User Review  - Shane Avery - Goodreads

A whole lot could be said about what this book is not, its shortcomings, theoretical and methodological. But as far as these old fashioned grand national political narratives go, this one excels ... Read full review

Review: The Age of Reform

User Review  - Brandy - Goodreads

Read this for a grad class. I can appreciate why it's important for my class and for history, but dear Lord, please don't make me read it again. Read full review

Contents

The Agrarian Myth and Commercial
23
THE FARMER AND THE REALmES
36
THE FRONTIER OH THE MARKET?
46
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (1955)

DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University from 1959 until the time of his death, Richard Hofstadter was one of the most influential historians in post--World War II America. His political, social, and intellectual histories raised serious questions about assumptions that had long been taken for granted and cast the American experience in an interesting new light. His 1948 work, The American Political Tradition, is an enduring classic study in political history. His 1955 work, The Age of Reform, which still commands respect among both historians and general readers, won him that year's Pulitzer Prize. A measure of Hofstadter's standing in literary and scholarly circles is the honors he received in 1964 for Anti-Intellectualism in American Life (1963)---Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize of Phi Beta Kappa, and the Sidney Hillman Prize Award. Hofstadter's greatest talent, however, may have been his ability to order complex events and issues and to synthesize from them a rational, constructively critical perspective on American history.