Presenting Your Findings: A Practical Guide for Creating Tables ; [an Educational Guide Based on the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association"]

Front Cover
American Psychological Association, Jan 1, 2010 - Psychology - 171 pages
0 Reviews
Gone are the days when researchers and students were forced to search through journals for the best way to construct a table of results. Updated to reflect current standards in reporting and graphic displays, Presenting Your Findings: A Practical Guide for Creating Tables, Sixth Edition, provides invaluable guidance on the proper table format for a wide range of statistical analyses in an engaging and accessible format. The authors have included statistics commonly used in analyses to make the book as useful as possible for researchers and students and have organized the chapters according to the complexity of the statistic. Each chapter is devoted to a different statistic and provides a variety of examples of how data could best be displayed. Included for each statistic is a "Play It Safe" table that illustrates the most comprehensive formatting options. This definitive resource for how to build tables will eliminate editorial drudgery and free up your time for more gainful pursuits.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2010)

Nicol is an assistant professor at the Military Psychology and Leadership Development at the Royal Military College of Canada. She obtained her BSc from McGill University and her MA and PhD from the University of Western Ontario. Her interests are in the areas of honesty-integrity testing, morality, legal issues in personnel selection, personality testing, test construction, transformational leadership, and emotional intelligence. Dr. Nicol has taught courses and workshops in organizational behavior, research methods, social psychology, interviewing techniques, group decision making, multimedia, and teaching.

Pexman is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Calgary. She received her PhD from the University of Western Ontario in 1998. In her research, she investigates the cognitive processes involved in word recognition and reading. Dr. Pexman has taught courses in introductory psychology, congnitive psychology, sensation and perception, and educational psychology and is the recipient of two teaching awards.

Bibliographic information