Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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William Richard Cutter
Lewis historical Publishing Company, 1908 - Boston (Mass.)
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There is a lot of information in these volumes than can lead you to finding more ancestors. But take care! I have found Cutter's dates to be unreliable. Also, when a father and son have the same first name, he often does not recognize that there were two generations. He gets the two families all jumbled up. I have found this to be the case for several of my ancestral families. Double check the information you find here whenever possible. 

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Wow! Thanks for sharing. I was able to find some more about my ancestory.

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Page 1335 - O'er the warm-colored heaven and ruddy mountain head. "Why weep ye then for him, who, having won The bound of man's appointed years, at last, Life's blessings all enjoyed, life's labors done, Serenely to his final rest has passed; While the soft memory of his virtues, yet, Lingers like twilight hues, when the bright sun is set?
Page 1400 - Company, then the most famous and prosperous of all the great trade guilds, numbering in its membership distinguished men of all professions, many of the nobility, and the Prince of Wales, and on March 13, 1614, Whitney, at the age of twenty-one, became a full fledged member.
Page 1552 - ER ancestor, was born in England and came to America in 1633. He was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. He was a linen weaver by trade and settled in Newbury in 1635. Coffin's History of Newbury says that his descendants still own the land he once held ; that his descendants are many and distinguished ; that one of them, Hon. George Plummer, was the first white child born west of the Allegheny Mountains in Pennsylvania, and the first congressman elected from that region. It is said that when settlers...
Page 1634 - And so we the assurers are contented, and do hereby promise and bind ourselves each one for his own part, our heirs, executors, and goods to the assured, their executors, administrators, and assigns for the true performance of the premises, confessing ourselves paid the consideration due unto us for this assurance by the assured...
Page 1205 - I put your name down in the list of those, whom I thought proper for the command, and whom I wished to see preferred. Diffidence in an officer is a good mark, because he will always endeavour to bring himself up to what he conceives to be the full line of his duty ; but I think I may tell you without flattery, that I know of no man better qualified than you to conduct a Brigade.
Page 1507 - ... name Hastings is of an illustrious family in history; and the race to which it applies is of Danish origin. In the early days of the British Kingdom, the Danes made frequent incursions upon that part of England and Scotland bordering upon the North Sea. It was in one of these incursions that Hastings, a Danish Chief, made himself formidable to Alfred the Great, by landing a large body of men upon the coast. He took possession of a portion of Sussex; and the castle and seaport were held by his...
Page 1398 - Robert, was knighted the day after Queen Mary's coronation in October, 1553. He was summoned before the privy council in 1555 and 1559. He was member of Parliament for Herefordshire in 1559, and died August 5, 1567. He married Sybil Baskerville, a descendant of William the Conqueror through the first wife of Edward I. XIV. Robert Whitney, son of Sir Robert, was mentioned in the will of his father, and also in an inquisition taken after the latter 'a death.
Page 1353 - Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig.
Page 1229 - He had great business activity and ability and was a person of extraordinary powers of mind, of great energy and skill in the management of affairs, and of singular sagacity, acumen and quickness of perception. He left a large estate.
Page 1622 - I did not see any thing wanting, according to the place, but something to stand on, for I was not free to set my feet upon the fine cane chair, lest I should break it.

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