Up from Slavery: An Autobiography, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Doubleday, Page & Company, 1901 - African American educators - 330 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
23
III
42
IV
63
V
80
VI
92
VII
106
VIII
118
X
148
XI
163
XIV
177
XV
196
XVI
217
XVIII
238
XIX
267
XX
293

IX
133

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 222 - There is no escape through law of man or God from the inevitable: The laws of changeless justice bind Oppressor with oppressed; And close as sin and suffering joined We march to fate abreast.
Page 220 - To those of the white race who look to the incoming of those of foreign birth and strange tongue and habits for the prosperity of the South, were I permitted I would repeat what I say to my own race, " Cast down your bucket where you are.
Page 240 - In all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress.
Page 39 - I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed.
Page 219 - Cast down your bucket where you are" cast it down in making friends in every manly way of the people of all races by whom we are surrounded. Cast it down in agriculture, mechanics, in commerce, in domestic service, and in the professions.
Page 219 - Cast it down in agriculture, mechanics, in commerce, in domestic service, and in the professions. And in this connection it is well to bear in mind that whatever other sins the South may be called to bear, when it comes to business, pure and simple, it is in the South that the Negro is given a man's chance in the commercial world, and in nothing is this Exposition more eloquent than in emphasizing this chance.
Page 220 - No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem.
Page 219 - Cast down your bucket where you are.' The captain of the distressed vessel, at last heeding the injunction, cast down his bucket, and it came up full of fresh, sparkling water from the mouth of the Amazon River.
Page 222 - There is no defense or security for any of us except in the highest intelligence and development of all. If anywhere there are efforts tending to curtail the fullest growth of the Negro, let these efforts be turned into stimulating, encouraging, and making him the most useful and intelligent citizen. Effort or means so invested will pay a thousand per cent interest. These efforts will be twice blessed— "blessing him that gives and him that takes.
Page 218 - Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Board of Directors and Citizens. One-third of the population of the South is of the Negro race. No enterprise seeking the material, civil, or moral welfare of this section can disregard this element of our population and reach the highest success. I but convey to you, Mr. President and Directors, the sentiment of the masses of my race when I say that in no way have the value and...

Bibliographic information