Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. Blackwood, 1819
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 259 - Ocean and earth, the solid frame of earth And ocean's liquid mass, beneath him lay In gladness and deep joy. The clouds were touched. And in their silent faces did he read Unutterable love. Sound needed none. Nor any voice of joy ; his spirit drank The spectacle : sensation, soul, and form All melted into him ; they swallowed up His animal being ; in them did he live, And by them did he live ; they were his life.
Page 259 - Sound needed none, Nor any voice of joy ; his spirit drank The spectacle ; sensation, soul, and form All melted into him ; they swallowed up His animal being ; in them did he live, And by them did he live ; they were his life, In such access of mind, in such high hour Of visitation from the living God, Thought was not ; in enjoyment it expired.
Page 358 - Hail to the State of England ! And conjoin With this a salutation as devout, Made to the spiritual Fabric of her Church ; Founded in truth ; by blood of Martyrdom Cemented; by the hands of Wisdom reared In beauty of Holiness, with ordered pomp, Decent, and unreproved.
Page 263 - There came a respite to her pain; She from her prison fled; But of the vagrant none took thought; And where it liked her best she sought Her shelter and her bread. Among the fields she breathed again: The master-current of her brain Ran permanent and free; And, coming to the banks of Tone, There did she rest; and dwell alone Under the greenwood tree.
Page 555 - The soul of music slumbers in the shell, Till waked and kindled by the master's spell ; And feeling hearts touch them but rightly pour A thousand melodies unheard before...
Page 160 - Created hugest that swim the ocean stream : Him, haply, slumbering on the Norway foam, The pilot of some small night-foundered skiff Deeming some island, oft, as seamen tell, With fixed anchor in his scaly rind Moors by his side under the lee, while night Invests the sea, and wished morn delays...
Page 262 - The wind, the tempest roaring high, The tumult of a Tropic sky, Might well be dangerous food For him, a Youth to whom was given So much of earth, so much of Heaven, And such impetuous blood.
Page 149 - ... of a great staircase, I saw a gigantic hand in armour. In the evening I sat down and began to write, without knowing in the least what I intended to say or relate. The work grew on my hands, and I grew fond of it. Add, that I was very glad to think of any thing rather than politics. In short, I was so engrossed with my tale, which I completed in less than two months...
Page 259 - My friend, enough to sorrow you have given, The purposes of wisdom ask no more : Be wise and cheerful ; and no longer read The forms of things with an unworthy eye. She sleeps in the calm earth, and peace is here.
Page 143 - Hindoos of the present day have no such views of the subject, but firmly believe in the real existence of innumerable gods and goddesses, who possess, in their own departments, full and independent power; and to propitiate them, and not the true God, are Temples erected, and ceremonies performed. There can be no doubt, however, and it is my whole design to prove, that every rite has its derivation from the allegorical adoration of the true Deity; but, at the present day, all this is forgotten; and...

Bibliographic information