Lectures on materia medica and therapeutics (Google eBook)

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Samuel S. and William Wood, 1861 - 563 pages
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Page 321 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fumes thereof nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 320 - Tobacco, divine, rare, superexcellent Tobacco, which goes far beyond all their panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used, but, as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as Tinkers do Ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health, hellish, devilish, and...
Page 320 - ... stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used ; but as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health, hellish, devilish and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.
Page 193 - Uoil two pounds of the mercury with the sulphuric acid, until the sulphate of mercury is left dry. Rub this, when cold, with the remainder of the mercury, in an earthenware mortar, until they are thoroughly mixed. Then add the chloride of sodium, and rub it with the other ingredients till all the globules disappear: afterwards sublime. Reduce the sublimed matter to a very fine powder, and wash it frequently with boiling distilled water, till the washings afford no precipitate upon the addition of...
Page 569 - MONTHS from the day of its first publication. It is a storehouse of knowledge for the student and practitioner of medicine full of practical precepts and bed-side information. Rarely has any medical publication met with such universal commendation from the medical press, both at home and abroad.
Page 305 - The following are the general conclusions deduced: " 1. That in cases of hydrocephalus, the coma and other symptoms are not to be considered as the direct effect of the effusion, but of that morbid condition of the brain of which the effusion is the consequence.
Page 320 - The Anatomy of Melancholy was the only work which Burton produced. After the 8th edition (1676), the book seems to have fallen into neglect, till Dr Johnson's remark, that it was the only book that ever took him out of bed two hours sooner than he wished to rise, again directed attention to it.
Page 46 - Oils are characterized by a peculiar unctuous feel, by inflammability, and by insolubility in water. They are divided into the fixed and volatile oils, the former of which are comparatively fixed in the fire, and therefore give a permanently greasy stain to paper ; while the latter, owing to their volatility, produce a stain which disappears by gentle heat.
Page 114 - The effect of this last operation is to clarity the oil, and to render it less irritating, by driving off the acrid, volatile matter. But much care is requisite not to push the heat too far, as the oil then acquires a brownish hue, and an acrid, peppery taste.
Page 427 - ... glass as would receive the impression of his seal. He did so, and as the wax accumulated, the capacity of the glass diminished, and, consequently, the quantity of whiskey it was capable of containing. By this plan he was cured of his bad habit altogether.

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