Report of the Annual Meeting, Volume 52; Volume 72 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1903 - Science
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Contents

On the Absorption of Ammonia from Water by Algic By Professor
6
Experiments for Improving tbe Construction of Practical Standards
53
Seismological Investigations Seventh Report of the Committee consisting
59
Magnetic Observations at Falmouth Report of the Committee consisting
75
Report on the Theory of Pointgroups Part II By Frances Habdcastlb
81
Meteorological Observations on Ben Nevis Report of the Committee consist
93
Absorption Spectra and Chemical Constitution of Organic Substances
99
On the Curves of Molecular Vibrations of Quinone
107
Hvdroaromatic Compounds with Single Nucleus By Arthur W Crossley
120
Wavelength Tables of the Spectra of the Elements and Compounds Report
137
The Nature of Alloys Report of the Committee consisting of Mr F
175
Lifezones in the British Carboniferous Rocks Report of the Committee
210
The Movements of Underground Waters of Northwest Yorkshire Third
224
Photographs of Geological Interest in the United Kingdom Thirteenth
229
Kesh Caves co Sligo Report of the Committee consisting of Dr R
247
Occupation of a Table at the Zoological Station at Naples Report
259
Investigations made at the Marine Biological Laboratory Plymouth Report
271
Index Generum et Specierum Animalium Report of the Committee consist
283
The Resistance of Road Vehicles to Traction Report of the Committee con
314
Small Screw Gauge Report of the Committee consisting of Sir W
350
Ethnological Survey of Canada Report of the Committee consisting
353
Anthropological Photographs Interim Report of the Committee consisting
449
The Age of Stone Circles Report of the Committee consisting of Dr J
455
On Explorations at Knooses in Crete Report of the Committee consisting
466
Investigation of the Cyanophycete Report of the Committee consisting
473
The Teaching of Science in Elementary Schools Report of the Committee
481
Report on the Conditions of Health Essential to the carryingon of
483
Section A MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE
499
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12
512
Discussion on the Neoula surrounding Jova Persei opened by A R Hinxs
521
11 A Theorem in Determinants By A A Robb
530
Preliminary List of the Minerals occurring in Ireland By Henby
598
Fossils from Cretaceous Strata in the Salt Range of India By Professor
604
Report on the Erratic Blocks of the British Isles p 252
606
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16
612
Address by Professor G B Howes D Sc LL D F R S Present of
618
Account of his Recent Expedition to the Indian Ocean including Work
643
On Protective Resemblance in the Malay Peninsula By H C
650
On the Structure of the Scales in the Cod By II W Marett Tims
660
Address by Colonel Sir T H Holdich C B K C I E F R G S President
662
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 12
678
On some Features of the Cork Rivervalleys By J Porter
684
Address by Edwin Cannan MA LL D President of the Section
688
from the Point of View of Economical Theory Bv Professor
697
The Effects on Ireland of the Adoption of Free Trade by the United
703
Some Urgent Needs of a Great City By Miss L A Walkington
709
Steam Turbines By Hon 0 A Parsons F R S
730
The Smokeless Combustion of Bituminous Fuel By W II Booth
736
On Objects of the Plateau Kind from the Interglacial Gravels of Ireland
756
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 16
766
Address by Professor W D Halliburton M D F R S President
771
A Case of Paralysis of Convergence By Cyril Shaw MI
781
Notes on a Census of the Flora of the Australian Alps Part I
799
Resistance of Seeds to High Temperatures By Henry H Dixon
805
On the Occurrence of the Nodular Concretions Coal Balls in the Lower
811
The Nucleus of the Oyanophycese By Haeold Wager
816
The Introduction of Practical Instruction into Irish National Schools
845
Joint Discussion with Section A on the Teaching of Mathematics
848
Report of the Conference of Delegates of Corresponding Societies held
856
The Making of a Dynamo By II A Mayor 730
905
stone F R S 586
3

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Page xxix - Its objects are— to give a stronger impulse, and a more systematic direction to scientific enquiry— to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the...
Page xxxii - Committee of doing justice to the several Communications, that each Author should prepare an Abstract of his Memoir, of a length suitable for insertion in the published Transactions...
Page 19 - For heat and cold are nature's two hands, whereby she chiefly worketh ; and heat we have in readiness, in respect of the fire ; but for cold we must stay till it cometh, or seek it in deep caves, or high mountains : and when all is done, we cannot obtain it in any great degree : for furnaces of fire are far hotter than a summer's sun ; but vaults or hills are not much colder than a winter's frost.
Page 9 - In fact, the whole process of evolution is the manifestation of a Power absolutely inscrutable to the intellect of man. As little in our day as in the days of Job can man by searching find this Power out.
Page 19 - New experiments and observations touching cold, or, An experimental history of cold, begun.
Page 56 - ... boiling water ; state and explain what will occur. 11. The inside of the wall of a house is at 15° C., and the outside at 0°C., the wall is of stone, and 50 cm. thick. Find how much heat passes across it per square metre. The conductivity of the stone is -005 and the unit of heat is the quantity required to raise the temperature of one gramme of water one degree centigrade.
Page 26 - Andrews called the critical temperature. He showed that this temperature is constant, and differs with each substance, and that it is always associated with a definite pressure peculiar to each body. Thus the two constants, critical temperature and pressure, which have been of the greatest importance in subsequent investigations, came to be defined, and a complete experimental proof was given that ''the gaseous and liquid states are only distinct stages of the same condition of matter and are capable...
Page 664 - It is, however, when we leave the high seas with their almost inexhaustible store of unexplored ocean floors and icebound coast-line, and turn from oceanography to the more familiar aspects of land geography that we find those spaces within which " pioneer " exploration can be usefully carried to be so rapidly contracting year by year as to force upon our attention the necessity for adapting our methods for a progressive system of worldwide map-making, not only to the requirements of abstract science,...
Page 27 - ... were almost independent quantities. His investigation of the capillarity constant was masterly, and he added further to our knowledge of the magnitudes of the molecules of gases and of their mean free paths. Following up the experiments of Joule and Kelvin, he showed how their cooling coefficients could be deduced, and proved that they vanished at a temperature in each case which is a constant multiple of the specific critical temperature. The equation of continuity developed by van der Waals...
Page 9 - The impregnable position of science may be described in a few words. We claim, and we shall wrest from theology, the entire domain of cosmological theory. All schemes and systems which thus infringe upon the domain of science must, in so far as they do this, submit to its control, and relinquish all thought of controlling it.

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