The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1813 - Byzantine Empire
32 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
16
4 stars
9
3 stars
3
2 stars
3
1 star
1

Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume I

User Review  - Rlotz - Goodreads

It speaks to the genius of Gibbon, and the grandeur of this work, that there are no historians or social scientists who call themselves 'Gibbonians'. There are Marxists, Freudians, Foucaultians; there ... Read full review

Review: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire Volume III

User Review  - Bryan - Goodreads

It's Gibbon and I finished it. I am too humble to attempt a review. Go ahead and read it, you'll be glad you did. Read full review

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxvii - It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June, 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page, in a summer-house in my garden. After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains.
Page xxvii - After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau or covered walk of acacias which commands a prospect of the country, the lake and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters and all nature was silent.
Page xxvii - ... berceau or covered walk of acacias which commands a prospect of the country the lake and the mountains the air was temperate the sky was serene the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters and all nature was silent i will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom and perhaps the establishment of my fame...
Page v - My lot might have been that of a slave, a savage, or a peasant; nor can I reflect without pleasure on the bounty of Nature, which cast my birth in a free and civilized country, in an age of science and philosophy, in a family of honourable rank, and decently endowed with the gifts of fortune.
Page 44 - The deities of a thousand groves and a thousand streams possessed, in peace, their local and respective influence ; nor could the Roman who deprecated the wrath of the Tiber deride the Egyptian who presented his offering to the beneficent genius of the Nile.
Page 41 - Rome by observing that the empire was above two thousand miles in breadth, from the wall of Antoninus and the northern limits of Dacia to Mount Atlas and the tropic of Cancer; that it extended in length more than three thousand miles, from the Western Ocean to the Euphrates; that it was situated in the finest part of the Temperate Zone, between the twenty-fourth and fifty-sixth degrees...
Page 130 - But the empire of the Romans filled the world, and, when that empire fell into the hands of a single person, the world became a safe and dreary prison for his enemies.
Page lviii - The gentle, but powerful, influence of laws and manners had gradually cemented the union of the provinces. Their peaceful inhabitants enjoyed and abused the advantages of wealth and luxury.
Page 207 - ... revenge of Severus with the generous clemency of Fingal ; the timid and brutal cruelty of Caracalla, with the bravery, the tenderness, the elegant genius of Ossian; the mercenary chiefs who, from motives of fear or interest, served under the Imperial standard, with the freeborn warriors who started to arms at the voice of the king of Morven ; if, in a word, we contemplated the untutored Caledonians, glowing with the warm virtues of nature, and the degenerate Romans, polluted with the mean vices...
Page v - I arrived at Oxford with a stock of erudition that might have puzzled a doctor, and a degree of ignorance of which a schoolboy would have been ashamed.

Bibliographic information