Theseus and Athens (Google eBook)

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Oxford University Press, Dec 20, 1994 - Political Science - 240 pages
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Theseus is celebrated as the greatest of Athenian heroes. This work explores what he meant to the Athenians at the height of their city-state in the fifth century B.C. Assembling material that has been scattered in scholarly works, Henry Walker examines the evidence for the development of the myth and cult of Theseus in the archaic age. He then looks to major works of classical literature in which Theseus figures, exploring the contradictions between the archaic, primitive side of his character and his refurbished image as the patron of democracy. His ambiguous nature as outsider, flouting accepted standards of behavior, while at the same time being a hero-king and a representative of higher ideals, is analyzed through his representations in the work of Bacchylides, Euripides, and Sophocles. This is the only work of scholarship that examines the literary representation of Theseus so thoroughly. It brings to life a literary character whose virtues, flaws, and contradictions belong in no less a degree to his creators, the people of Athens.
  

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Contents

I
3
II
4
III
9
IV
15
V
20
VI
35
VII
47
VIII
50
XIV
94
XV
113
XVI
127
XVII
143
XVIII
146
XIX
171
XX
195
XXI
199

IX
55
X
61
XI
64
XII
83
XIII
84
XXII
202
XXIII
207
XXIV
217
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