Tin House: Fantastic Women, Volume 33

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Tin House Books, Sep 1, 2007 - Fiction - 224 pages
29 Reviews
Tin House has become a forerunner of brilliant and fresh contemporary fiction, and this astonishing collection captures some of the most promising literary voices writing today. The anthology includes tastes of Aimee Bender's surreal aesthetic, Miranda July's charming and quirky prose, and Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum heart-stopping and lyrical style. Edited by virtuoso novelist and memoirist Rick Moody, this is not only a collection of great fiction, but also a compendium of awe-inspiring work from women on the cutting edge of literary greatness.

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Review: Tin House: Fantastic Women (Tin House #33)

User Review  - Goodreads

Uneven anthology of stories by women, some very beautiful, others not my cup of tea. I really like plot and most New Weird does not have that. Read full review

Review: Tin House: Fantastic Women (Tin House #33)

User Review  - Melinda Belle Harrison - Goodreads

Uneven anthology of stories by women, some very beautiful, others not my cup of tea. I really like plot and most New Weird does not have that. Read full review

About the author (2007)

As a child, Aimee Bender enjoyed reading fairy tales, particularly the stories of Hans Christian Andersen. She began creating her own stories, and later, as an elementary school teacher, she enjoyed telling her students both traditional fairy tales and stories she had made up herself. Eventually, she began writing short stories, which have been published in a variety of magazines, including Granta, GQ, Story, and The Antioch Review. Her first book, The Girl in the Flammable Skirt, a collection of her stories, was published in 1998. Bender's work is intended for adults rather than children, but many of her short stories could be described as contemporary fairy tales. Bender's stories often include some of the same elements that she enjoyed encountering in fairy tales, such as of magic, fantasy, surprise, humor, and absurdity. Although she has found success as a writer, Bender continues to teach because she enjoys the interaction with others and feels she needs that contact to balance the solitude that is required for her writing. In addition to teaching elementary school, she has taught in the UCLA Extension Writers' Program and in the writing program at the University of California at Irvine, where she received her M.F.A. Bender lives in Los Angeles.

Judy Budnitz grew up in Atlanta and attended Harvard University. She was a fellow at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and received her MFA from New York University. Her stories have appeared in "Story," "The Paris Review," "Glimmer Train," and the anthology "25 and Under," She lives in New York City.

Sarah Shun-lien Bynum's fiction has appeared in the Georgia Review and Alaska Quarterly Review. She lives with her husband in Brooklyn, New York. Madeleine Is Sleeping is her first novel.

Novelist Rick Moody was born in Fairfield, Connecticut on October 18, 1962. He is an undergraduate of Brown University and has a Master of Fine Arts Degree from Columbia University. Moody's works often demonstrate the concept that money makes no difference in the problems people face. His first novel, Garden State, won Pushcart's Tenth Annual Editor's Book Award. The Ice Storm (1994) was adapted into the 1997 film starring Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver. In 1999, The New Yorker chose him as one of America's most talented young writers, listing him on their "20 Writers for the 21st Century" list. He has also won the Addison Metcalf Award and has received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Moody's memoir The Black Veil (2002) won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir. His other works include The Diviners and The Four Fingers of Death. In 2012 he won Fernanda Pivano Award in Italy. Moody has taught at Yale University, Princeton University, the State University of New York at Purchase and Bennington College, and New York University.

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