Manual of Members, Officers, and Standing Committees and Rules of the House of Delegates; Also, the Constitution of Virginia, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Superintendent of Public Printing., 1887 - Virginia
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Page 39 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing...
Page 72 - Every law which imposes, continues or revives a tax shall distinctly state the tax and the object to which it is to be applied, and it shall not be sufficient to refer to any other law to fix such tax or object.
Page 62 - All city, town and village officers whose election or appointment is not provided for by this Constitution, shall be elected by the electors of such cities, towns and villages, or of some division thereof, or appointed by such authorities thereof, as the Legislature shall designate for that purpose.
Page 34 - The rules of parliamentary practice, comprised in Jefferson's Manual, shall govern the House in all cases to which they are applicable, and in which they are not inconsistent with the standing rules and orders of the House, and joint rules of the Senate and House of Representatives.
Page 41 - That a well-regulated militia, composed of the body of the people trained to arms, is the proper, natural, and safe defence of a free state; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty, and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination...
Page 71 - No money shall be paid out of the state treasury except in pursuance of appropriations made by law...
Page 40 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services ; which not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge, to be hereditary.
Page 54 - No law shall embrace more than one object, which shall be expressed in its title ; nor shall any law be revived or amended with reference to its title, but the act revived or the section amended, shall be reenacted and published at length.
Page 41 - That, in all capital or criminal prosecutions, a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty...
Page 29 - No motion or proposition on a subject different from that under consideration shall be admitted under color of amendment.

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