Main Street

Front Cover
Penguin, 2008 - Fiction - 475 pages
21 Reviews
The provocative masterpiece

Sinclair Lewis’s Main Streetis notable for shattering the uniquely American myth of the open, progressive-minded small town. Its incisive attack on the provincial mentality stunned a nation proud of its new prosperity and power.
  

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Review: Main Street

User Review  - John - Goodreads

I still can't decide if I liked this book or not. I was fascinated that although this book was written nearly 100 years ago, the description of human nature as expressed thru a small community echoes ... Read full review

Review: Main Street

User Review  - Cass - Goodreads

The main character is me. Wow, she is blowing me away by her similarities, and I am both impressed with the ability to capture me in text, and embarrassed that the one literary character that ... Read full review

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Contents

II
17
III
27
IV
35
V
46
VI
69
VII
84
VIII
97
IX
110
XXII
269
XXIII
281
XXIV
293
XXV
306
XXVI
325
XXVII
334
XXVIII
342
XXIX
345

X
116
XI
126
XII
140
XIII
162
XIV
171
XV
178
XVI
194
XVII
213
XVIII
223
XIX
235
XX
249
XXI
259
XXX
360
XXXI
375
XXXII
387
XXXIII
396
XXXIV
409
XXXV
423
XXXVI
431
XXXVII
438
XXXVIII
445
XXXIX
451
XL
464
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Sinclair Lewis was born in 1885 in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, and graduated from Yale University in 1908. His college career was interrupted by various part-time occupations, including a period working at the Helicon Home Colony, Upton Sinclair's socialist experiment in New Jersey. He worked for some years as a free lance editor and journalist, during which time he published several minor novels. But with the publication of Main Street (1920), which sold half a million copies, he achieved wide recognition. This was followed by the two novels considered by many to be his finest, Babbitt (1922) and Arrowsmith (1925), which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1926, but declined by Lewis. In 1930, following Elmer Gantry (1927) and Dodsworth (1929), Sinclair Lewis became the first American author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for distinction in world literature. This was the apogee of his literary career, and in the period from Ann Vickers (1933) to the posthumously published World So Wide (1951) Lewis wrote ten novels that reveal the progressive decline of his creative powers. From Main Street to Stockholm, a collection of his letters, was published in 1952, and The Man from Main Street, a collection of essays, in 1953. During his last years Sinclair Lewis wandered extensively in Europe, and after his death in Rome in 1951 his ashes were returned to his birthplace.

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